WLW-AM

Provided by Mark Dawidziak / CBS Television

Rod Serling's first Cincinnati TV drama, "The Keeper of the Chair," aired on WKRC-TV's "The Storm" drama series 65 years ago, on July 10, 1951.

Premiere Networks

He wasn't canceled, he quit. Or retired.

WLW-AM talk host Bill Cunningham told his radio audience Friday that he's ending his daytime CW TV network "Bill Cunningham Show" after five seasons.

WVXU

Congrats to my coworkers (especially Tana Weingartner) at WVXU-FM, who won first place for "Best Newscast" at the Ohio Associated Press Awards presented Sunday in Columbus.

Weingartner also brought home three awards. Here's the scoop from WVXU's Kevin Reynolds:

Provided by Clyde Haehnle

Veteran broadcasting engineer and executive Clyde Haehnle will be honored Friday when the National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting names its new meeting and exhibit space Clyde Haehnle Hall.

Haehnle, 93, a VOA Museum board member, has been a huge supporter of the museum effort at the VOA's Bethany Relay Station, where he worked as a University of Cincinnati electrical engineering co-op for Crosley Broadcasting. Crosley built the facility in 1942-44 during World War II.

Provided / Jim LaBarbara

That vacant red brick building at Ninth & Elm Streets downtown bought by Kroger recently was once the studios for WLW-AM’s Jim LaBarbara, Rich King and James Francis Patrick O’Neill, and WLWT-TV’s Peter Grant, Gene Randall, Phil Samp and meteorologist Tony Sands.

For about 20 years, the COMEX building housed WLW’s radio operations and TV news across the street from WLW headquarters at Crosley Square, now the Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy-Armleder campus.

From the mid 1950s until 1976, people could sometimes watch WLW TV newscasts or radio shows through the huge plate glass windows and hear via outdoor speakers. Channel 5 viewers also saw announcer Bill Myers and DJ Jim “The Music Professor” LaBarbara do weather from the building’s roof.

Clyde Haehnle collection

Cincinnati’s first radio station celebrates its 94th birthday today in the midst of a fight with the federal government for WLW-AM to keep its nighttime 50,000-watt power reaching 38 states.

On this date in TV Kiese history, March 2, 1922, Cincinnati industrialist Powell Crosley Jr. started what would become known as the “Nation’s Station.” It has operated on 50,000 watts around the clock since 1943, when the government ended its 500,000-watt “super power” experiment.

But some day you no longer will be able to listen to the “Big One” and Reds games on radio while in Florida, New York, Chicago or Atlanta (as I have), if the Federal Communications Commission gets its way.

Cincinnati Reds

Play ball! Fans get their first look at the new, young Reds when Fox Sports Ohio and WLW-AM broadcast the Reds spring opener 3 p.m. Tuesday, March 1, from Goodyear, Ariz.

FSO will televise the second game, also against the Cleveland Indians from Goodyear, at 3 p.m. Wednesday.  FSO will carry two more spring games: Reds-Royals 1 p.m. Tuesday March 15, and Reds-Rockies 4 p.m. Friday March 25, according to the Reds broadcast schedule.

Marty Brennaman and Jeff Brantley will do the opener on WLW-AM, and the Wednesday game on Fox Sports WSAI-AM (1360). 

Now we know why attorney Lisa Wenzel Wells has not hosted her Saturday  WLW-AM talk show for three weeks:  She was charged with five counts of drug possession, and operating a vehicle under the influence, on Jan. 25 on I-75 north of Dayton.

Wells, 37, of West Chester Township, was arrested at 8:20 p.m. Monday Jan. 25 on I-75 near Piqua by Ohio State Highway Patrol officer Eric Dever, who was investigating a complaint of a vehicle driving recklessly, according to his report.

Provided by Jim Scott

  Jim Scott is living like a kid since retiring from radio last March: Sleeping in. Going on long hikes or rides in his Gator on his farm. Looking for arrowheads in creeks. Trying to figure out what he’s going to do the rest of his life.

That’s what he told me when I visited him recently at his Dearborn County farm to invite him to come on WVXU’s “Cincinnati Edition” talk show Wednesday, and interview him for this story and for the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce’s Leadership Cincinnati newsletter.

We talked about everything. And you can talk to him too, when he’s a guest on WVXU’s “Cincinnati Edition” call-in show at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Scott lives with his wife Donna on a 132-acre farm across the road from Perfect North Slopes. Until last March, he had been heard since 1968 on old WSAI-AM, YES95, WINK94.1 and WLW-AM (except for year at New York’s WNBC-AM). Here’s what we talked about:

Tribune Broadcasting

Before we welcome 2016, let’s look back at this year in TV, movies, radio and media from A to Z.

Connie Wernet

Bonnie Lou, the last remaining star from Ruth Lyons’ TV show and Cincinnati’s Golden Age of Live TV, died Tuesday at age 91.

The country, rockabilly and pop music singer performed for 30 years on WLW’s iconic “Midwestern Hayride,” “Boone County Jamboree,” Lyons’ “50-50 Club” and the “Paul Dixon Show,” the crazy weekday morning host who inspired young David Letterman. 

After leaving TV when Dixon died in 1974, she continued to entertain for another 30 years at fairs, festivals, pageants and concerts. Her last major public performance here was at the 2006 Tall Stacks riverboat festival.

WCET-TV

Veteran broadcaster Nick Clooney was surprised Monday with an award acknowledging his efforts to preserve Greater Cincinnati radio and TV history.

Clooney, 81, was presented a special Founder’s Award from Media Heritage Inc. -- the local nonprofit broadcasting archive which has displays at the Voice of America Museum in West Chester --  during the organization’s presentation of the new “Earl Hamner Storyteller” documentary at the Covington’s Carnegie Performance Center Monday night.

When Marc Amazon leaves Friday, who will take over his 9 p.m. show on WLW-AM? Mo Egger? Rocky Boiman? Lisa Wells? Sterling? Tom Gamble? Gary Jeff Walker?

Here’s what Amazon says: “I still don't Mo my successor. It can be Rocky sorting out the candidates, and there are only so many Wells you can look down to find talent. They don't have to be perfect, but require a Sterling reputation in the community. You want someone with upside, but can't afford too much of a Gamble. The only thing I can say for certain is they wouldn't want someone who requires a Walker.”

While he enjoys fueling speculation about his successor, there’s one topic he wants to be absolutely clear about – his health a year after bladder cancer surgery. 

Premiere Networks

Bill Cunningham’s flagship station has benched his national Sunday night talk show for NFL football.

“Live On Sunday Night, It’s Bill Cunningham” airs on nearly 350 stations – but not on Cunningham’s hometown WLW-AM, his long-time employer, this fall. Both WLW-AM and his national syndicator, Premiere Networks, are owned by iHeartMedia (formerly Clear Channel).

“It’s a contract issue with iHeartMedia,” Cunningham says.

Wikipedia

 On this date in TV Kiese History…

Aug. 26, 1939:  The Cincinnati Reds played the Brooklyn Dodgers in the first televised Major League Baseball game seen by the few people with TV sets in the New York City area 76 years ago today.

Red Barber, who started his professional sports announcing career doing Reds radio for Crosley Broadcasting’s WLW-AM and WSAI-M, broadcast the game on NBC’s experimental TV station W2XBS.

During the game from Ebbets Field, Barber also did the first TV commercial -- for Procter & Gamble’s Ivory Soap.

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