Saturday on The Book Club @ 91.7

Roseanne Montillo: Wilderness of Ruin

The Wilderness of Ruin A Tale of Madness, Fire, and the search for America's youngest serial killer is a riveting tale of gruesome murder and depravity. At its heart is a great American city divided by class—a chasm that widens in the aftermath of the Great Fire of 1872. Roseanne Montillo brings Gilded Age Boston to glorious life—from the genteel cobblestone streets of Beacon Hill to the squalid, overcrowded tenements of Southie. Here, too, is the writer Herman Melville. Enthralled by the...
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Sunday on Around Cincinnati

"Remember the Future," Daniel Arsham's exhibit at the Contemporary Arts Center

Cleveland native Daniel Arsham is the creative mind behind Remember the Future, a new installation at the Contemporary Arts Center. He joins Jane Durrell to discuss what the exhibition is all about and what he hopes visitors will take away from it.
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Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Students from Xavier were at Fountain Square Friday to give something away: hugs.

The event was part of the Center for Interfaith Community Engagement's Golden Rule Week, which was designed to teach that the idea of “do unto others as you would have them do unto you” is found in many different faiths and traditions.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Betty Ann Smiddy of the Hamilton Avenue Road to Freedom Committee tells the story best:

"On a rainy night of April 3, 1853, 28 courageous African-Americans escaped their bondage in Boone County, Kentucky. Led by abolitionist John Fairfield, they crossed the Ohio River near Lawrenceburg, Indiana and followed him to the mouth of the Mill Creek, where they temporarily hid.

Provided / Campbell County Public Library

Campbell County is joining in the Little Library craze.

Forty shelters for free books will soon begin popping up around the county thanks to a program from the public library. Community members could buy the boxes for ten dollars and then were asked to decorate them. They're often placed in neighborhoods or outside someone's home.

Council member Ryan Salzman helped get Bellevue involved. He thinks it's the simplicity that draws people to the Little Libraries.

Mark Heyne / WVXU News

If you're heading into Downtown this weekend, plan accordingly.

Northbound I-71 is slated to be closed between Reading Rd/Gilbert Ave and Dana this weekend. The closure begins at 10 p.m. Friday, April 17. The highway will reopen around 6 a.m. Monday, April 20.

It’s pretty much accepted by education researchers that preschool attendance has positive long term effects—people who go to preschool are more likely to be successful in K-12 education and to adapt socially to being around other kids. Yet, preschool numbers for Latino kids nationally and in Ohio are lower than other ethnic groups. 

The Educational Track

As Ohio House leaders put forward a budget that they say will help people out of poverty, the directors of the state’s job and family services agencies say they have some answers as to why people need public assistance.

Substance abuse problems, lack of transportation and high school diplomas are the issues that people on welfare or public assistance face.

That’s the conclusion of a survey done by a task force with the Ohio Job and Family Services Directors Association.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Clermont County's only remaining covered bridge is once again open to traffic. The Stonelick-Williams Corner Covered Bridge reopened Wednesday with a ribbon cutting.

The bridge was built in 1878. Restoration work began in 2013 but was delayed when the entire structure collapsed into the creek below in February, 2014.

Janet Oligee has lived in the area all her life and describes the reopening in one word: "marvelous."

Ohio House GOP proposes budget very different from the Kasich plan

Apr 15, 2015
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Republican leaders of the Ohio House want to scrap some tax hikes proposed by Gov. John Kasich. But they also want to keep a proposed tax cut, even though it won’t be as big as he wanted.

Kasich’s proposed budget included a three quarter of a percent increase in the state’s sales tax. It would apply the sales tax to some services that are not currently taxed.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Six of the nine Ohioans who were exonerated after being sentenced to death want state lawmakers to consider changes to capital punishment in Ohio.

Joe D’Ambrosio spent 22 years on death row for a Cleveland murder he didn’t commit.

“If it can happen to me, it can happen to you, or your children, or your grandchildren,” D’Ambrosio said.

He and five other exonerated former death row inmates want state lawmakers to seriously consider the 57 recommendations made by an Ohio Supreme Court task force on capital punishment last year.

Provided / SORTA

Cincinnati officials could be looking to plug about a $500,000 hole in the streetcar operating budget.  

The Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority, which will run the system, now estimates fare revenues will be about $675,000 a year.  That is less than an earlier estimate of $1 million.  
 

Part of the reduction could be in how fares are charged.  SORTA is planning for $1 for a two-hour pass.  Earlier studies were based on $1 per trip.

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Cincinnati Edition encore

Meet 2 Cincinnati educators who have been chosen to go on expeditions with National Geographic

Thirty-five highly respected educators from the United States and Canada have been selected as this year'’s Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Education Grosvenor Teacher Fellows. The Fellows will take expeditions to locations such as Iceland, Greenland and Antarctica, for hands-on experience, professional development, and what most would say, a trip of a lifetime.
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Politically Speaking

Howard Wilkinson brings you the latest in local and national politics.

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