Saturday on The Book Club @ 91.7

Maureen Corrigan - So We Read On: How the Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why it Endures

In her book So We Read On Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan discusses the legacy of The Great Gatsby. She is also part of the Cincinnati Library's On the Same Page program this year.
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Sunday on Around Cincinnati

The Essex Studios welcome visitors and shoppers to their first Art Walk of the year

Barbara Gray welcomes in local glass artist Risa Sreden Prince to talk about the Essex Studios, the artist collective/gallery in Walnut Hills that hosts its first Art Walk of the year on March 6-7.
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Jay Hanselman

The Cincinnati Police Department is celebrating the completion of its first recruit class in more than six years.  

56 officers and one firefighter who took the 26-week training courses received their commissions Friday during a ceremony in Downtown Cincinnati at The Masonic Center.  They will now spend the next 13 weeks with training officers.  

The class valedictorian was James Hutchings, who is currently a Cincinnati Firefighter.  He went thru police training to be a sworn officer inside the fire department.  Hutchings had this advice to his fellow graduates.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

A new exhibit opens Saturday at the Cincinnati Art Museum, celebrating a man who's been called "one of the most visionary American fashion designers of the 20th century." Though you may not know his name, you've seen his influence play out in the clothing world.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Star Sailor Energy and Aerospace Research Systems (ARSI) now have funding to scale up an energy storage system and on-demand power module that could one day fit in your pocket and charge your cell phone.

Cincinnati aerospace scientist and company CEO Dr. Pamela Menges invented the storage system that she  says is greener than a battery because it doesn't use chemicals and generate heat. She says it can:

Provided / Cincinnati Museum Center

The discovery of a rare Native American artifact in Newtown is exciting for archeologists, but it's also raising more questions.

Contractors digging a trench for a fiber optic box north of Newtown's administrative hall earlier this month found human remains.  They called police who quickly realized it was a burial site and not a crime scene.  They, in turn, called the Cincinnati Museum Center.

Jon Hughes/photopresse

Throughout the Civil War, on the bloody battlefields and in the hospitals overflowing with the wounded, many a mortally wounded young soldier left this life looking into the kindly face of a nun from Cincinnati.

“Lord have mercy on his soul,’’ were the last words he heard, and a promise from the woman dressed in black that she would tell his mother that he died bravely.

She was Sister Anthony O’Connell, known throughout the Union Army as “the Angel of the Battlefield.”

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Hamilton County Commissioners officially voted Wednesday to 'close the book' on the idea of using the former Mercy Mt. Airy hospital for a new crime lab.

Coroner Lakshmi Sammarco says she's not satisfied.

"We're very disappointed that the appropriate people weren't brought together to make just the retrofit happen for the crime lab and the morgue in such a way that the current hospital spaces could have been used without costing the tax payers a whole lot of money," Sammarco says.

Former Ohio Democratic governor Ted Strickland made it official Wednesday morning – he will run for the U.S. Senate seat now held by Republican Rob Portman.

Strickland, who lost his race for re-election as governor in 2010, made the announcement official in an e-mail Wednesday morning, ending months of speculation about whether he would jump into the race.

“I’m running for the United States Senate in 2016 because I am determined to restore the American dream for working people in this country,’’ Strickland said in a press release.

Mark Heyne / WVXU

When the Cincinnati Reds return from spring training in Arizona, they should find new signs at Great American Ball Park. 

The three neon signs, above the scoreboard, over the main gates, and on the southwest corner of the outside, will be replaced with LED lighting. 

Normally, the team and Hamilton County would be responsible for the $1 million to $2 million cost, but Scott Beeken with Great American Insurance Group says it will pay.

Hamilton County / Provided

After more than a year of waiting for an answer, the group which owns the former Mercy Mt. Airy hospital site is looking for new options.  

Mercy Health offered to give Hamilton County the former hospital building. The idea was to renovate part of the facility into a crime lab, replacing the county's current cramped outdated one.

But this week, commissioners agreed to decline the offer.

Spokeswoman Nanette Bentley says Mercy Health is already weighing other options.

Sarah Ramsey / WVXU

Hamilton County will pay $800,000 in the case of a former morgue attendant, Kenneth Douglas, who was convicted of sexually abusing bodies. Additional non-economic terms will also be announced when they are determined.

Three families sued the county. The maximum they could have been awarded is $3.2 million.

Attorneys for the families say they will pursue a judgment for damages from Douglas in the amount of $2,450,000.00. However, Douglas is in default so it's unclear how much they could ever end up collecting.

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