U.S. Supreme Court

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Dozens of attorneys representing four states, and the lawsuits against them, have converged in Washington D.C. to argue whether same-sex marriage should be allowed in two of those states and whether they should be recognized in the other two.

The Supreme Court will hear arguments next week in a landmark case on gay marriage, with same-sex couples challenging bans in Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan, and Tennessee. Joining us to discuss the legal path same-sex marriage has traveled so far in the United States, and what the process of arguing before the Supreme Court involves, are UC College of Law Judge Joseph P. Kinneary Professor of Law, Verna Williams; Kennith Katkin, professor of law at the NKU Chase College of Law; and, WVXU reporter Ann Thompson.

U.S. Supreme Court says early in person voting won’t start in Ohio Tuesday

Sep 29, 2014

Early voting that was set to begin Tuesday won’t happen after all.

The U.S. Supreme Court has put a hold on in person, early voting in Ohio. The ruling will remain in effect until the court acts on an appeal by state officials. And since that appeal has not yet formally been filed , it means the Golden week, when Ohioans can both register to vote and cast a ballot at the same time, will not be allowed. 

    A federal appeals court in Cincinnati will hear arguments Wednesday on five same-sex marriage cases that could possibly provide the foundation for a landmark opinion by the U.S. Supreme Court. The cases Wednesday involved Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan and Tennessee. Same-sex marriage has been legalized in nineteen states and the District of Columbia. WVXU'’s Ann Thompson joins us for the latest on the story.

Ohio Government Website

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is going to the U.S. Supreme Court to appeal a Friday decision by a federal appeals court here that restored early in-person voting on the final three days before the election.

"This is an unprecedented intrusion by the federal courts into how states run elections, and because of its impact on all 50 states as to who and how elections will be in run in America, we are asking the Supreme Court to step in and allow Ohioans to run Ohio elections,'' the Republican secretary of state said in a written statement.