scary

Being frightened, heart pounding, adrenaline pumping, cold-sweat fear, is not an enjoyable experience. Except when it is. Just look at the popularity of haunted houses, horror films and novels. People like a good scare, under the right circumstances. With us this Halloween to take a look at why so many of us seek out things that frighten us are Miami University psychology professor Dr. Elizabeth Kiel; Gary Vaughn, associate professor of English at University of Cincinnati’'s McMicken College of Arts and Science; and joining us from Pittsburgh public radio WESA, Dr. Margee Kerr, a sociologist at the University of Pittsburgh and Chatham University who studies the science of fear. Dr. Kerr is an advisor for ScareHouse in Pittsburgh, which has been ranked as one of “America’'s Scariest Halloween Attractions by the Travel Channel.

Scaredown Facebook page

I am a big fan of Halloween and scary movies so I’ve been to a lot of haunted houses in my time.  In my experience, they usually involve somebody clutching onto you as you guide them through a semi-dark maze that is dotted with dizzying strobe lights and lots of plastic body parts soaked in fake blood while people in creepy clown masks or mad scientists jump out at you from various hidden corners.

But then there is SCAREDOWN, located in Waynesville, OH.  SCAREDOWN is not your typical haunted house. According to their web site, their goal is to “make you lose control of every bodily function you have.”