same sex marriage

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Dozens of attorneys representing four states, and the lawsuits against them, have converged in Washington D.C. to argue whether same-sex marriage should be allowed in two of those states and whether they should be recognized in the other two.

The Supreme Court will hear arguments next week in a landmark case on gay marriage, with same-sex couples challenging bans in Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan, and Tennessee. Joining us to discuss the legal path same-sex marriage has traveled so far in the United States, and what the process of arguing before the Supreme Court involves, are UC College of Law Judge Joseph P. Kinneary Professor of Law, Verna Williams; Kennith Katkin, professor of law at the NKU Chase College of Law; and, WVXU reporter Ann Thompson.

Provided / HRC

A week after releasing its ranking of cities, the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) has graded American corporations on how friendly they are to gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender employees.  The HRC looked at 26 employers in Ohio and gave a perfect score to half of them, including three in Cincinnati.

Search corporations' rankings at the HRC website.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The federal appeals court in Cincinnati has upheld anti-gay marriage laws in Ohio and three other states.

In a break with other circuit court decisions, the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati decided two-to-one to uphold lower court rulings against same-sex marriage in Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky and Tennessee.

Many are speculating this could lead the U.S. Supreme Court to take up the issue. And Ohio plaintiffs attorney Al Gerhardstein says he and his clients do intend to ask the Court to do just that.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

It's a waiting game now as judges in the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals mull over arguments to both overturn and uphold federal decisions in same sex marriage cases. They involve decisions in four states including Ohio and Kentucky.

Nobody knows how or when the court will rule. Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee and Michigan want cases overturned that grant the right to marry, recognize out of state marriages and allow same-sex parents on birth certificates and partners on death certificates.

Provided

A federal appeals court in Cincinnati is scheduled to hear arguments Wednesday on the constitutionality of same-sex marriage bans in six separate cases involving four states.

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will consider challenges to state same-sex marriage bans in Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee and Michigan.

So many reporters and court observers are expected the court will have two overflow rooms with live audio streaming of the oral arguments.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine is appealing two local cases:

    A federal appeals court in Cincinnati will hear arguments Wednesday on five same-sex marriage cases that could possibly provide the foundation for a landmark opinion by the U.S. Supreme Court. The cases Wednesday involved Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan and Tennessee. Same-sex marriage has been legalized in nineteen states and the District of Columbia. WVXU'’s Ann Thompson joins us for the latest on the story.

There will be no hot-button ballot issues to draw Ohio voters to the polls this November. WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about it.

Wikipedia

In a new report, researchers say Indiana, the most recent state studied by the Williams Institute, would see an economic boost of  $39.1 million to the state and local economies, should same-sex marriage become legal there.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Six Cincinnati same-sex couples have filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against The Director of the Ohio Department of Health and the Director of the Hamilton County Probate Court .

The suit seeks to "secure for same-sex couples across Ohio the right to marry on an equal basis with opposite-sex couples."

The Plaintiffs are Michelle Gibson and Deborah Meem; Heather Apple and Mary Koehler; Ronald Kastner Beck and Dave Beck; Andrew Hickman and Ethan Fletcher; Gary Goodman and Karl Rece, Jr.; and Rhonda Craig and Kendra Dukes.

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