presidential election

ohioswallow.com

Since the 19th century, the only Democrats to lose Ohio yet win the presidency were John F. Kennedy and Franklin D. Roosevelt. And no Republican has ever lost the state and won the White House. 

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Kyle Kondik along with Howard Wilkinson and Mark Heyne will talk about Ohio's importance in presidential elections at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County's downtown branch on Monday, September 19 at 7pm. Admission is free.

Ohio has been deemed the bellwether state when it comes to presidential politics, and for good reason. 

John Kiesewetter

With candidates making a joke of the presidential campaign this year, too bad comedian Pat Paulsen isn’t around to satirize the craziness.

Paulsen, the deadpan comic who died in 1997, made satirical runs for the White House in 1968 -- at  the height of the Vietnam War – on CBS’ “Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour” show.  He offered hope and change, boldly pronouncing: “We have nothing to fear but fear itself – and the Boogey Man!”

Looking back on his comical crusade nearly 50 years ago, I’m surprised that his wacky rhetoric remains so relevant. 

amazon.com

The political environment of 1896 had a lot of similarities to today: an electorate transformed by a growing immigrant population, an uncertain economy disrupted by new technology, growing income inequality and political gridlock that prevented the parties from resolving big issues.

The Rand Paul phenomenon seems to have crossed the river into Ohio.


Actually, the popularity of the junior senator from Kentucky has crossed a lot of boundaries in recent months – the point where he is considered by many a legitimate contender for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination.


Before the 2010 election, he was a practicing ophthalmologist, running a clinic down in Bowling Green, Ky. It was his father who was the famous one – then-Texas congressman Ron Paul, who has run three times for president as a Libertarian and a Republican.

Michael Keating

Kentucky's junior senator, Rand Paul, was the narrow favorite for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination in a straw poll this weekend of over 3,000 conservative activists from around the country.

CPAC (the Conservative Political Action Committee) held a three-day gathering in a Maryland suburb of Washington, D.C.; and participants voted online for who they would like to see carry the presidential banner for the GOP in 2016.

For decades now, Democratic candidates running in Ohio - from president to mayor - have turned to one man for help, the one man who is probably the most popular Democrat in the Buckeye State - former senator and astronaut John Glenn.

Ohio, you may make history on the night of Nov. 6.


You may elect a new president without giving him your 18 electoral votes.


Consider this rather remarkable truism of American political history:


No Republican presidential candidate – going all the way back to the first Republican president, Abraham Lincoln in 1860 – has won the White House without winning Ohio.


Mitt Romney could be the first.


This is not to say he will lose Ohio; he may, in fact, win the Buckeye State.

University of Cincinnati

After this weekend's Homecoming festivities are over, the University of Cincinnati plans to focus on finding its next president.

Tana Weingartner

Vice presidential hopeful Rep. Paul Ryan returned to his alma mater Miami University to rally support for the Romney campaign. Several thousand supporters cheered and waved American flags as he jogged to the podium.

The 1992 Miami grad called it good to back on campus.

“I spent a lot of my formative years here. I like my Skyline 5-way, turkey gobblers, cheese fries at Skippers, Bagel and Deli is still here for sure, right? Oh, I also went to school here,” he laughed.

This Morning Howard Wilkinson talks with Maryanne Zeleznik about the presidential race and the latest poll that looks at Ohio, Pennsylvania and Florida.