Kasi Infrared / Provided

Potholes can be punishing on your car and wallet. A new AAA survey estimates they cost drivers $6.4 billion per year. They also cost the transportation departments that have to repair the roads.

Cincinnati is in the process of filling 10,000 potholes in three weeks.

But what if work crews could repair potholes permanently? They can, according to Roger Filion, president of Kasi Infrared.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati's Public Services director calls potholes a rite of spring.  Now the city is gearing up to repair 10,000 of them in the next three weeks.  

Gerald Checco told a council committee Tuesday the department needs help from the public.

"As you know, we do not have inspectors roaming around and making surveys of streets," Checco said.  "We depend on our citizens and our elected officials and our people to tell us where the potholes are."

A city release lists several ways for residents to report potholes:

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati is gearing up for a major blitz in about two weeks to fix the growing number of potholes in the city.  

Traffic and road operation superintendent Jarrod Bolden says all resources from public works will be focused on the issue starting March 3rd.  He spoke to a city council committee Wednesday.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

This week's spring-like temperatures might provide some reprieve from the winter doldrums, but they're likely to cause headaches for drivers.

Ohio Department of Transportation spokeswoman Sharon Smigielski says conditions are ripe for creating potholes.

"The warmer temperatures accelerate the freeze/thaw cycle causing pavement to deteriorate more quickly," she says.

Since it's still too cold for permanent fixes, road crews will use a cold patch mixture to plug potholes.

To report potholes:

Ohio highways & state routes: 513-933-6568