police-community relations

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

A member of Ohio's police-community collaborative board says Thursday night's meeting at the University of Cincinnati was one of the best attended on the road. But Karhlton Moore admits low turnout remains a challenge. The room was less than half full and many of those present were law enforcement officers.

Provided / Ohio Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board

More than 500 law enforcement agencies in Ohio are adopting statewide standards for use of force - including deadly force - hiring practices, body cameras, and other issues.

Karen Kasler/Ohio Public Radio

  The panel working on police and community relations has come up with draft standards on the use of force, police recruitment and hiring; and expects to deliver them to Gov. John Kasich by Sept. 3.

The draft standards say police will only be able to use deadly force to defend themselves or another person from serious injury or death; and that law enforcement agencies should hire qualified individuals and create diverse work forces.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati's city manager grew up in Baltimore and served as that city's finance director before relocating here.  Harry Black says it saddens him to see what's happening in his hometown.

And Black says Baltimore will have a chance to improve police-community relationships much like Cincinnati did following the 2001 riots.

  The relationships between local police and the people in the areas they serve have been under ever-closer scrutiny during the year, with calls for greater oversight and reforms increasing with each new incident involving possible excessive force by police officers. An upcoming Northern Kentucky Forum will address police community relations and explore the measures local police departments have enacted to build trust in their communities.

Nick Castele

CLEVELAND - A state task force on police-community relations held its first meeting here Tuesday night and heard from about 20 citizens on their treatment by police.

Some speakers recommended collecting data on racial profiling in Ohio, training officers to respond to people with mental illness, and setting up an independent panel to review police shootings. Many speakers urged the task force to consider race in its final proposals.

The task force is slated to deliver a report to Gov. John Kasich by the end of April.