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The Two-Way
9:01 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Militants Reportedly Overrun Tikrit, As 500,000 Flee Mosul

A cellphone photo shows an armored vehicle belonging to Iraqi security forces in flames Tuesday, after hundreds of militants launched a major assault in Mosul. Some 500,000 Iraqis have fled their homes in the large city since militants took control.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 10:32 pm

This post was updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

As refugees stream out of Mosul after the Iraqi city was captured by forces of the al-Qaida-linked Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, NPR's Deborah Amos passes along reports that Tikrit, the hometown of the late dictator Saddam Hussein, has also been overrun.

The Associated Press says "soldiers and security forces [in Tikrit have] abandoned their posts and yielded ground once controlled by U.S. forces."

According to AP:

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The Two-Way
7:56 am
Wed June 11, 2014

'Stunning': Reactions To Eric Cantor's Election Loss In Virginia

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., left, and Dave Brat react after the polls closed Tuesday. Brat defeated Cantor in the Republican primary, a result that shocked many political analysts.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 10:00 am

"Dollars don't vote — you do." And with that statement to his supporters, college professor Dave Brat ousted seven-term Rep. Eric Cantor in their primary battle Tuesday night. The loss by the No. 2 House Republican shocked many political analysts and the congressman himself.

"It's disappointing, sure," Cantor told supporters after the results came in. "But I believe in this country. I believe there's opportunity around the next corner for all of us."

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Krulwich Wonders...
6:03 am
Wed June 11, 2014

How We Learned That Frogs Fly

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 10:51 am

There are places where frogs could be — but aren't.

And places where frogs could be — and are.

Ninety years ago, scientists were debating the question of animal dispersal. How come there are kangaroos in Australia, and none in southern Africa --which seems, environmentally, very kangaroo-friendly? Certain frogs show up in warm ponds in one part of the world, but warm ponds a thousand miles away have none. Why?

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The Salt
5:25 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Lobbyists Loom Behind The Scenes Of School Nutrition Fight

Patrick McCoy (right) and Harry Fowler of Schwan's Food Service show off their company's Big Daddy's pizza at the School Nutrition Association's national conference in Chicago in 2007.
Brian Kersey AP

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 6:01 pm

The School Nutrition Association — what you might call the national organization for lunch ladies (and gents) — says it was trying to improve the healthfulness of school lunches.

But it says the U.S. Agriculture Department didn't help when things got tough, so it went to Congress. House Republicans provided help, but they also put the group in the middle of a partisan battle over what to feed America's school students.

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It's All Politics
5:06 am
Wed June 11, 2014

College Colleagues Will Face Off For Eric Cantor's Seat

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 10:27 pm

Two professors at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Va., find themselves in an unexpected position after Tuesday's primary elections: facing each other in November for a seat in Congress.

David Brat, an economics professor with little political experience, defeated House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in the Republican primary for the 7th District.

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