News From NPR

Economy
4:19 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Massive Digital Heist Allegedly Hits Bitcoin Market

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 4:09 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

The digital currency bitcoin has hit a major hurdle. A leading exchange for bitcoin has halted all transactions and has frozen customer accounts. This exchange is called Mt. Gox. And earlier today, it temporarily disappeared from the Internet. The happened amidst reports that Mt. Gox was hit by an alleged theft that could amount to about six percent of all the bitcoins in circulation.

Read more
Law
4:19 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Same-Sex Parenting Goes On Trial In Detroit

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 8:01 pm

Michigan's ban on same-sex marriage goes on trial today in Detroit, and Michigan Public Radio's Rick Pluta is there. A lesbian couple wants to settle the doubts over same-sex parenting.

Code Switch
3:24 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Are Americans Tired Of 'Arrogant British' TV Personalities?

Piers Morgan poses for a portrait backstage during a 2011 press tour.
Chris Pizzello AP

When the interviewer for BBC Radio finally reached me Monday to talk about the failure of Piers Morgan's 9 p.m. interview show on CNN, she basically had one question, asked many different ways.

Are Americans finally tired of arrogant British TV personalities?

Read more
Parallels
2:40 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

The Colombian Politician With An Incredible Back Story

Clara Rojas waves as she arrives at an airport near Caracas, Venezuela, on Jan. 10, 2008, after being released from six years of captivity by Colombian rebels.
Gregorio Marrero AP

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 9:06 pm

Politicians on the campaign trail love to talk about their personal stories and they often mention their kids as well. It can be pretty routine stuff, unless you happen to be Clara Rojas, a candidate for Congress in Colombia's elections next month.

Rojas, a lawyer, was a central figure in one of the most dramatic episodes of Colombia's long guerrilla war. In 2002, she was managing the presidential campaign of Ingrid Betancourt when both women were kidnapped by Marxist rebels.

Read more
Author Interviews
2:23 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

During World War I, Germany Unleashed 'Terrorist Cell In America'

A fireboat sits amid ruins and debris on the piers at Black Tom Island in Jersey City, N.J., on July 30, 1916. Evidence pointed to German sabotage. In Dark Invasion, Howard Blum explores Germany's spy network and sabotage efforts in the U.S. at the beginning of World War I.
AP

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 12:06 pm

In the early years of World War I, as many as 1,000 American horses per day were shipped off to Europe to assist in the Allied war effort, even though the United States was officially neutral. Those horses became the target of germ warfare, infected with anthrax cultures on American soil; at the same time, mysterious explosions were rocking U.S. munitions factories, and fires were breaking out on ships headed to Europe.

Read more

Pages