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Education
12:28 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Hot Tips To Reinvent Education

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we will hear the story of one young woman who literally put her life on the line to go to school. Shabana Basij-Rasikh will join us to talk about growing up under Taliban rule in Afghanistan and the work she's doing now to make sure other young Afghan women can get an education. That's in just a few minutes. But first, we are continuing our conversation with our education innovators.

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Education
12:28 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Educational Innovators Ask 'Why Can't Learning Be Fun?'

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
12:20 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Federal Rule Extends Subsidies For College Students

Students at Yale University and several other schools that are self-insured will qualify for subsidies under the federal health law after all.
Christopher Capozziello Getty Images

Beginning in 2014, most people, including students, will have to have health insurance, whether or not they are claimed as a dependent on their parents' tax returns.

The federal health law says if they don't, they or their parents will face penalties.

While expansion of coverage under the health law has helped about 3 million young people get insurance through their parents' plans, many remain uninsured or have coverage through student health plans.

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It's All Politics
12:18 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Democrats Face The Two States Of Texas: Urban And Rural

Texas is beginning to trend urban (downtown Houston, left), which could be good news for Democrats, who tend not to do well in rural areas like Wise County near Boyd (right).
David J. Phillip (left)/LM Otero (right) AP

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 2:32 pm

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

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Parallels
11:59 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Nelson Mandela's Prison Adventures

Near the end of his 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela was taken to secret meetings with government officials and for drives around Cape Town. Here, he returned to his Robben Island prison cell for a visit in 1994, shortly before he became South Africa's first black president.
Louise Gubb Corbis

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 7:15 pm

On Christmas Eve 1986, a South Africa prison commander responsible for watching over Nelson Mandela casually asked the world's most famous prisoner, "Mandela, would you like to see the city?"

Mandela was completely surprised, but agreed. The prison commander, Lt. Col. Gawie Marx, promptly put Mandela in his car for a leisurely drive around Cape Town, one of the world's most scenic cities.

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