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All Tech Considered
8:22 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Utah Internet Firm Defies State's Warrantless Subpoena Law

Pete Ashdown is founder and CEO of XMission, Utah's oldest Internet service provider.
Flickr via Center for Study of Ethics at UVU

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 9:51 am

Utah's oldest Internet service provider, XMission, has refused to give up customer information to law enforcement, reports The Salt Lake Tribune. Specifically, the company says it won't comply with administrative subpoenas.

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The Two-Way
7:53 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Reports: Egypt Orders Arrest Of Muslim Brotherhood Leader

Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie in Cairo last December.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 8:57 am

Prosecutors in Egypt have ordered that Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie be arrested, according to Egyptian state television and other news outlets.

NPR's Leila Fadel adds from Cairo that she's been told about the order by an Egyptian security official with knowledge of what's happening.

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The Two-Way
7:34 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Book News: 'Ender's Game' Author Responds To Boycott Threats

Orson Scott Card poses at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, in 2008.
Wikimedia Commons/ Nihonjoe

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 7:08 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Boston Bombings Suspect To Appear In Survivor-Packed Court

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 9:35 am

When the young man who stands accused in the Boston Marathon bombings makes his first court appearance Wednesday afternoon, survivors of the explosions that killed three people and wounded more than 260 are expected to be in the room, The Associated Press reports. So are relatives of those killed and wounded.

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The Two-Way
5:38 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Investors Brace For News Out Of Fed Minutes

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke during a news conference in June. Financial markets reacted to comments he made then by selling off bonds and stocks.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 9:13 am

After the Federal Open Market Committee meeting last month, the financial markets "freaked out," according to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's remarks at the time sent a shockwave through the markets when he suggested the Fed's stimulus could end.

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