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The Two-Way
7:11 am
Wed August 14, 2013

2 Killed When UPS Cargo Plane Crashes In Alabama

Debris burns as a UPS cargo plane lies on a hill near Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport after crashing Wednesday.
Hal Yeager AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 1:36 pm

We're monitoring the news from Birmingham, Ala., where a UPS cargo plane crashed Wednesday morning. UPS says the incident involves UPS Flight 1354, which was traveling from Louisville.

The flight, which would normally last about 45 minutes, had been scheduled to land before 5 a.m. local time, according to several flight-tracking websites. Louisville is in the Eastern time zone, while Birmingham is in the Central.

We'll update this post as details emerge.

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The Two-Way
6:44 am
Wed August 14, 2013

'Bloodbath' In Cairo As Troops Move On Morsi Supporters

Protesters taunt security forces moving in to clear one protest camp near the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo. The military-backed government described the camps as violent and unlawful.
Hesham Mostafa EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:00 am

  • On 'Morning Edition' just after 10 a.m. ET: NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

(We most recently updated the top of this post at 5:08 p.m. ET.)

In what looks to be the bloodiest day since the July 3 ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, dozens of people in Cairo were killed Wednesday as government forces moved to clear Morsi's supporters from sites where they have been camped.

By evening, the ministry of health reported 275 people had been killed and 2,001 had been injured across the country. The government said 43 policemen had been killed.

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The Salt
3:05 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Listeria Outbreak Still Haunts Colorado's Cantaloupe Growers

A melon washing station sprays cantaloupes with clean water and sanitizer.
Kristin Kidd

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 1:48 pm

Two years after cantaloupe were linked to one of the worst foodborne outbreaks in U.S. history, lawyers have filed a fresh round of lawsuits. Meanwhile, farmers are trying to win back customers after their signature crop was tarred by a broad brush.

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The Record
3:04 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Why Steinway Is Likely To Be Sold To A Hedge Fund Manager

The Steinway Musical Instruments factory in Queens, N.Y.
Ilya Marritz

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 11:16 am

Steinway & Sons, the 160-year-old musical instrument maker, is set to change hands.

Last month, a private equity firm emerged as the company's likely buyer. But a mystery bidder — rumored to be hedge fund manager John Paulson — has swooped in at the last minute, and now looks likely to take control of one of the oldest manufacturers in the United States. Paulson made billions betting against the housing market at a time when many thought housing prices could only go up. His reported offer for the company is $458 million.

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Energy
3:01 am
Wed August 14, 2013

10 Years After The Blackout, How Has The Power Grid Changed?

The sun sets over the Manhattan skyline during a major power outage affecting a large part of the Northeastern United States and Canada on Aug. 14, 2003. Ten years later, some improvements have been made to the grid to prevent another large-scale blackout.
Robert Giroux Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 12:58 pm

Ten years ago, a sagging power line hit a tree near Cleveland, tripping some circuit breakers. To compensate, power was rerouted to a nearby line, which began to overheat and sink down into another tree, tripping another circuit. The resulting cascade created a massive blackout in the Northeast U.S., affecting power in eight states and part of Canada.

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