News From NPR

The Two-Way
8:43 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Job Growth Cooled A Bit In August, Report Signals

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 9:39 am

There were 176,000 more jobs on private employers' payrolls in August than the month before, according to the latest ADP National Employment Report.

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Krulwich Wonders...
8:33 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Wild Things Hanging From Spruce Trees

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 10:45 am

Stanley Kunitz, one of our great poets, planted a spruce tree next to his house in Provincetown, Mass., and over the years that tree attracted some tenants, a family of garden snakes. I didn't know garden snakes climb trees, especially needly ones like a spruce, but they do.

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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Egyptian Official Survives Attack As 'Remarkable Calm' Broken

Security officials inspect the scene of a bomb blast that apparently targeted Egyptian Interior Minister Mohammed Ibrahim near his home in Cairo's Nasr City on Thursday. He survived the attack.
Khaled Elfiqi EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 9:35 am

Just a few hours after this headline:

"Egyptians Hail Military Order as Calm Returns to Streets." (The Wall Street Journal)

... The still tenuous state of affairs in Egypt was underscored by this news:

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Book News: Did A Missing Testicle Make J.D. Salinger A Recluse?

A photo of J.D. Salinger taken in September 1961.
AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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It's All Politics
7:15 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Presidential Hopefuls Stake Out Syria Positions

Books by would-be 2016 presidential candidates, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., share a table display at the Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, Md., on March 15. Both Rubio and Paul on Wednesday voted against military action in Syria.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 8:35 pm

Voting in favor of war or military strikes has proved to have long-lasting political consequences for politicians angling for the highest office in the land.

Just ask former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, whose 2002 vote for the Iraq War resolution as a U.S. senator contributed to her failure to secure the Democratic presidential nomination six years later.

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