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Shots - Health News
5:00 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Maine Once Again Allows Mail-Order Canadian Drugs To Cut Costs

They're back: Cheaper mail-order medications from Canada and other foreign lands.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 12:03 pm

It's deja vu all over again in Maine.

For the first time in years, a state has acted to allow its citizens to purchase prescription drugs by mail from other countries. The idea is to take advantage of those nations' lower prices, which can be half the cost of those at American pharmacies.

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The Two-Way
4:33 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Senate Approves Sweeping Immigration Overhaul, In Final Vote

The Senate has passed a sweeping immigration bill, widely seen as the product of the "Gang of 8," a group that includes Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz. (left), and Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. The two shook hands before Thursday's final vote.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:19 pm

The Senate approved a sweeping immigration bill Thursday, endorsing a bill that would put millions of immigrants who illegally entered the United States on a path to citizenship. The final vote tally on the bill was 68 in favor, with 32 opposed.

The bill also includes measures that would punish employers who take advantage of immigrant workers, as well as providing billions in spending to employ fences and high-tech tools to help secure the border between the U.S. and Mexico.

All 52 Democratic senators voted for the bill, along with 14 Republicans and two independents.

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The Salt
4:27 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

What The Rise Of Cage-Free Eggs Means For Chickens

Cage-free chickens in Harold Sensenig's barn near Hershey, Pa., get to roam and perch on steel rods, but they don't go outside.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 9:32 pm

The typical life of an egg-laying chicken is beginning to change dramatically.

Ninety percent of the eggs we eat come from chickens that live in long lines of wire cages, about eight birds to a cage. Animal welfare groups have long been campaigning against these cages.

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Parallels
4:12 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

In Symbolic Move, U.S. Cuts Trade Privileges For Bangladesh

Garment factory workers come out from a building during a lunch break in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in June. Many Bangladeshi garment factories are considered to be poorly constructed.
A.M. Ahad AP

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 4:45 pm

The U.S. suspended some trade benefits to Bangladesh on Thursday, citing unsafe working conditions. But in the near term it appears unlikely to have a major impact on the country's crucial garment industry.

Here's why: Bangladesh was suspended from the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) program, so U.S. duties will rise on a range of items from tobacco to plastic. But this program doesn't cover garments — Bangladesh's main export to America.

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Shots - Health News
3:51 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

How Head Injuries Seem To Affect The Risk For Stroke

The cause of strokes in younger people remains largely a mystery.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 3:47 pm

Twenty percent of strokes hit people under age 65, and the cause of many of those strokes remains a mystery. Having had a concussion or other traumatic brain injury might make the risk of a stroke more likely, a study says.

Back in 2011, researchers in Taiwan had unearthed an association between traumatic brain injury and stroke by combing through hospital records.

It's one of those "Oh, really?" findings that gets scientists itching to check it out themselves.

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