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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Sat October 5, 2013

Storm Brings Blizzard To Wyoming And South Dakota

As snow fell in Rapid City, S.D., Friday Brenda Nolting took groceries to her car. An early snow storm swept through Wyoming and western South Dakota, dropping more than two fee of snow in some areas.
Steve McEnroe AP

Originally published on Sat October 5, 2013 4:15 pm

More than two feet of snow has crippled roadways in western South Dakota, the worst-hit target of a storm that brought snow to Wyoming and tornadoes to Nebraska Friday. Heavy snowfall and low visibility have combined to cause crashes and shut down roads.

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The Two-Way
9:11 am
Sat October 5, 2013

Family Questions Shooting Death Of Woman At U.S. Capitol

Officers on Capitol Hill look at a car following Thursday's shooting, which left Miriam Carey, 34, dead. "We're still very confused as a family why she's not still alive," Carey's sister says.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Sat October 5, 2013 9:51 am

The death of Miriam Carey, killed by police gunfire Thursday after leading a car chase from the White House to the Capitol, is prompting questions from her family about whether she deserved to die. The incident, of which details remain unexplained, is leading experts to analyze the actions of the officers present.

"We're still very confused as a family why she's not still alive," Carey's sister Amy Carey-Jones told the AP late Friday. "I really feel like it's not justified, not justified."

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Governing
8:03 am
Sat October 5, 2013

Morale Plummets For Federal Workers Facing Unending Furlough

John Zangas, a furloughed federal worker, protests the government shutdown outside the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 5, 2013 3:13 pm

The work that Shaun O'Connell does is required by law, yet now he's sidelined by the government shutdown.

O'Connell reviews disability claims for the Social Security Administration in New York, checking that no one's gaming the system, while ensuring people with legitimate medical problems are compensated properly.

Billions of dollars are at stake with this kind of work, yet O'Connell is considered a nonessential employee for purposes of the partial government shutdown.

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Around the Nation
8:03 am
Sat October 5, 2013

A Cold, Wet Trip With Spearfishers In Alaska

Alaskan Cory Kuryla (right) goes spearfishing every year along the Chatanika River, north of Fairbanks, with best friend Dave Ensley.
Emily Schwing KUAC

Originally published on Sat October 5, 2013 11:11 am

For one month each fall, residents of interior Alaska don chest waders and splash through the clear, frigid water of the Chatanika River. With large homemade lanterns hanging from their necks and spears in their hands, the fishermen keep their eyes peeled for whitefish.

Lifelong Alaskan Cory Kuryla leads his best friend Dave Ensley and me down a dark forest trail.

"We make rookies take a bite out of the first fish they catch!" he says.

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Reporter's Notebook
8:03 am
Sat October 5, 2013

Does Capitalism Work? A True/False Quiz In Times Square

Steve Lambert's art installation asks people to vote in an effort to open up the discussion about capitalism. That word can be a red flag for many, Lambert says.
Jake Schlichting Times Square Arts

Originally published on Sat October 5, 2013 11:52 am

I'm walking through Times Square, the crossroads of the world. Just when I reach the line for cheap Broadway tickets, I see it: a giant billboard with the word "capitalism" in bright white lights and the words "works for me!" in cursive below. There's a podium and two buttons where you can vote whether the statement is "true" or "false."

Peggy Demitrack, a tourist from Cleveland, is adamant when she pushes the "true" button. She says capitalism works for anyone who strives and educates themselves.

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