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Science
5:45 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage

This map from the NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory shows the amount of heat energy available to Typhoon Haiyan between Oct. 28 and Nov. 3. Darker purple indicates more available energy. Typhoons gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. The path of the storm is marked with the black line in the center of the image.
NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 7:13 pm

The deadly typhoon that swept through the Philippines was one of the strongest ever recorded. But storms nearly this powerful are actually common in the eastern Pacific. Typhoon Haiyan's devastation can be chalked up to a series of bad coincidences.

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The Two-Way
5:27 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Atlanta Braves Shock Fans With Plan To Move To Suburbs

Undeveloped land stands in the area where a new stadium will be built for the Atlanta Braves. Monday, the team announced that it will leave Turner Field and move into a new stadium outside the city.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 7:21 pm

In a move that took many fans by surprise, the Atlanta Braves announced Monday that the team will move to the city's suburbs, where it will build a new stadium. The team's lease on Turner Field, the Braves' home since 1997, will expire in 2016.

The new stadium will be located "just outside Atlanta's city limits," reports Atlanta Daily World.

Georgia Public Broadcasting's Jane Hammond reports:

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The Two-Way
5:18 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Storm Surge And Low-Lying Philippines Made A Deadly Combination

Residents wade through flood waters on Sunday in Tacloban City, Leyte, Philippines, in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.
Jeoffrey Maitem Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:03 pm

The worst part of Typhoon Haiyan, which is thought to have killed as many as 10,000 people in the Philippines, was storm surge, NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on All Things Considered.

Joyce spoke with storm surge expert Carl Drews, of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado. Dawes says the surge was greatest at Tacloban City, where the Leyte Gulf narrows into the San Pedro and San Pablo Bay.

"That is about the worst path and the worst place for surge," Drews says.

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Shots - Health News
4:57 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

$4.2 Billion Deal Highlights Drug Profits From Rare Diseases

Flemming Ornskov, CEO of Shire, says the company's offer for ViroPharma is part of a broader push into orphan drugs.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:14 am

Two drugmakers you may have never heard of just agreed to a big deal.

Ireland's Shire says it's paying $4.2 billion for ViroPharma, which makes a drug to treat a rare condition called hereditary angioedema. People with the inherited condition are prone to swelling that can be life-threatening. About 1 in 50,000 people have the genetic mutation that causes the problem.

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Parallels
4:33 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Will The French Really Pay More for 'Made in France'?

French Minister for Industrial Renewal Arnaud Montebourg attends the Made in France fair in Paris on Saturday. According to a poll, more than 70 percent of the French say they would pay more for goods made at home.
Alain Jocard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:52 pm

The French economy suffers from many ailments: weak growth, high unemployment, poor competitiveness and a general sense of economic gloom. And every proposed government remedy seems to be met by protests from one corner or another.

Yet no one seems to be arguing with a little injection of economic patriotism.

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