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The Two-Way
3:35 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

How About A Coke? Warhol Painting Up For Grabs

Coca-Cola (3) was one of many of Warhol's pop art pieces, which celebrated popular culture and consumerism in post-World War II America.
Courtesy of Christie's

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 4:59 pm

On Tuesday, artist Andy Warhol's oversized and iconic Coca-Cola (3) will hit the auction block at Christie's, and to borrow an old slogan from the company, It's The Real Thing.

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All Tech Considered
3:07 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

For A Few Hundred Bucks, You Can Make Your Own 3-D Printer

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 9:20 am

You can print out almost anything with a 3-D printer, from weapons and prosthetic hands to Yoda figurines and

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The Two-Way
2:54 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

China's Leaders Unveil Economic Reforms

Plainclothes policemen guard in front of Tiananmen Gate outside the Great Hall of the People where the Communist Party's 205-member Central Committee gathered for its third annual plenum on Tuesday.
Feng Li Getty Images

China's leaders have laid out a plan to wrest a bigger chunk of the country's economy from state control and turn it over to the free market in hopes of stimulating growth and curb corruption.

At the end of the four-day Third Plenum meeting, Communist Party leaders said that state ownership would continue to play a key role in the economy, but endorsed more private ownership.

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The Two-Way
2:33 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

One Of Fed's First Quantitative Easers: 'I'm Sorry, America'

Andrew Huszar.
Rutgers

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:32 pm

One of the men who oversaw the Federal Reserve's first round of quantitative easing is making a remarkable statement with an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal today.

"I'm sorry, America," Andrew Huszar writes.

Huszar, who was initially hired by the Fed to oversee the purchase of $1.25 trillion worth of mortgage bonds in a year, goes on to describe the program as the "greatest backdoor Wall Street bailout of all time."

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Parallels
2:22 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Do For-Profit Schools Give Poor Kenyans A Real Choice?

Young students in a Bridge International Academy school in Nairobi, in September. On the surface, there's little to distinguish these schools from others in the developing world. But Bridge's model relies on teachers reading lessons from tablets.
Frederic Courbet for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 1:54 pm

Bridge International Academies has set up more than 200 schools in Kenya over the past four years, and plans to open 50 more in January.

Using a school-in-a-box model, Bridge's founders say it gives primary schoolkids a quality education for roughly $5 a month.

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