News From NPR

News From NPR

Discovery Channel set viewership records in 2013 as millions of people tuned in to watch sharks feed, sharks attack, extinct giant sharks and researchers catch and tag sharks. Discovery's "Shark Week" returned on Sunday, and this year, to the dismay of conservationists, restaurants and markets nationwide are feeding the frenzy with a slew of shark meat promotions.

The use of different photos to portray shooting victim Michael Brown, who was killed by a police officer Saturday, prompted an interesting phenomenon on Twitter Monday: Users are posting "dueling" photos of themselves – one where the subject looks wholesome, and another where the same person might look like a troublemaker – with the hashtag #IfTheyGunnedMeDown.

Afghans voted for a president on April 5. Then they cast ballots June 14 in a runoff between the top two candidates. Now all 8 million votes from that second round are being audited, a laborious process that includes daily arguments, occasional fistfights and yet another deadline that seems to be slipping away.

The NCAA is moving to appeal a federal judge's ruling that would require the organization to allow colleges to compensate students who play football and basketball. Current and former students had sued on antitrust grounds over the use of their names and images for video games, TV programs and other commercial enterprises.

A judge gave the athletes a victory Friday — but the NCAA has a strong track record when it appeals.

Questions about how Tony Stewart's race car came to strike and kill another driver in a sprint car race Saturday include what prompted the other driver to stand on the track — and why Stewart, an elite NASCAR driver, was racing in the lower-level event. Police who are looking into the death of driver Kevin Ward Jr. say no charges are pending.

Shortly after finishing my second year of medical school I have come to Iquitos, Peru. With a population of nearly half a million, it is the world's largest city inaccessible by road. Iquitos is located along the Amazon River, so the only way to get here is by boat or airplane. And cars come at a premium.

The main mode of transport is the motokar, a motorized versions of the three-wheeled rickshaw, with loud two-stroke engines and no emissions controls. Rush hour sounds as if you're surrounded by an angry swarm of lawnmowers. The exhaust can be stifling in the hot, humid air.

The trial of a 58-year-old truck driver who is accused of firing more than 700 shots at other vehicles on German highways over five years began today in the northern Bavarian city of Wuerzburg.

The man, who German media say was born in the former East Germany, was arrested at home in the small town of Kall in western Germany in June 2013. He is being identified by the German media only by his first names and last initial – Michael Harry K. — in accordance with German laws.

Iraq's president has asked the parliament's deputy speaker to form a new government, after members of the Shiite coalition that had backed Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki nominated the deputy, Haider al-Abadi, to the post Monday.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is in Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, covering the Ebola outbreak that began earlier this year in Guinea and has spread to neighboring countries.

When we reached her by phone on Sunday, she was in a car "trying to fight an infestation of ants." Back in her hotel, she shared her impressions.

You mentioned that you're just back from church.

Every year, more than 20 million students apply for federal financial aid to help pay for college. Five years ago, Mandy Stango was one of them.

To get there, though, Stango felt confused and woefully unprepared. That confusion started with the very first step in the process, as she and her family had to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The FAFSA.

"I sat there, I read the directions, and crossed my fingers and hoped I was doing the right thing," says Stango, who's now 23.

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