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1:06 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

What Really Got Measured In This Month's Jobs Report?

Graphic designer Tom Sadowski, 65, works from home in Sterling, Va., in October. Many experts believe the economy is becoming too complicated for the Bureau of Labor Statistics to measure accurately using current methods.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 2:58 pm

In October, private employers did a lot of hiring, but a government shutdown forced hundreds of thousands of workers to stay home.

Those federal furloughs offset 204,000 jobs created last month — enough to push the unemployment rate one tick higher to 7.3 percent, the Labor Department said on Friday.

Or maybe the end of that sentence should read: the Labor Department guessed on Friday.

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It's All Politics
12:59 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Presidential Apologies: Regrets, They Have A Few

President Obama walks from the White House to Marine One on Friday. In an interview Thursday with NBC News, he apologized for breaking a promise regarding the Affordable Care Act.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 2:31 pm

Now that President Obama has apologized to those who've seen their health care plans canceled due to the Affordable Care Act, losses he pledged beforehand wouldn't happen, he joins the line of modern presidents who have had to look the American people in the eye and give their regrets.

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Shots - Health News
12:34 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Polio In The Middle East And Africa Could Threaten Europe

A doctor vaccinates a child against polio at a health clinic in Damascus, Syria, on Nov. 6. To stop the disease from spreading beyond Syria, health officials plan to vaccinate 20 million children in the region.
Youssef Badawi EPA /LANDOV

Polio outbreaks in the Middle East and Africa could spread to Europe if precautions aren't taken, researchers say.

The recent discovery of the poliovirus in Syria, Somalia and Israel should be a wake-up call for European health officials, according to epidemiologist Martin Eichner at the University of Tuebingen in Germany.

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

How Tall Is The Washington Monument? Surveyors Take To The Top

National Geodetic Survey crew members Roy Anderson, left, and Steve Breidenbach set up survey equipment used to measure the height of the Washington Monument.
National Geodetic Survey/NOAA

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:23 pm

The National Geodetic Survey doesn't often get the opportunity to take detailed measurements of the massive stone obelisk that sits in the middle of Washington, D.C.

But a 2011 earthquake in nearby Mineral, Va., damaged the Washington Monument enough that to repair it, the tower had to be wrapped in scaffolding. That gave surveyors access to the very top of the structure.

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The Two-Way
12:26 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Poet Pablo Neruda Was Not Poisoned, Officials In Chile Say

Chilean writer and diplomat Pablo Neruda died from prostate cancer, not poison, officials say. He was serving as Chile's ambassador to France in 1971 when he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature.
STF AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 2:57 pm

It was prostate cancer, not an assassin's poison, that killed poet Pablo Neruda, officials in Chile announced Friday. The Nobel laureate's body was exhumed for testing this spring, due to claims from an employee and Neruda's family that the Chilean poet had been murdered at age 69.

From The Santiago Times:

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