music

Local musician Chuck Brisbin is in our studio with Bob Nave to preview the upcoming Cincy Blues Fest

Commentary: The Ohio Phonograph Company

Jul 8, 2016

The Ohio Phonograph Company was the first record company to operate out of Cincinnati, and its history involves legal battles with the father of the phonograph, Thomas Edison

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Imagine it's 1971, you and some high school buddies record a couple songs. You sell the 45 to your friends, put it in a few jukeboxes in your hometown and... life just goes on. Then 45 years later, you get an unexpected email.

Starting April 15, the Constella Festival brings a diverse schedule or art and music back to an array of venues around the city.

Our contributor David Lewis is the chair of the Cincinnati chapter of the Association for Recorded Sound Collections and gives lectures each month at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County about this area’s long, distinguished history of recording sound and music.

While Playboy may be changing some of the visual content in its magazine, there’s no denying the impact it has made to music, particularly jazz, over the decades.  Ron Esposito talks with Patty Farmer, the author of the new book Playboy Swings: How Hugh Hefner and Playboy Changed the Face of Music.

It just may be a universal truth: one of the best ways to reach teens is with and through music. The Music Resource Center— - Cincinnati is a multifaceted teen program that uses recording and performing arts, as well as life skills mentoring, to create a sense of empowerment and accomplishment in the urban community.

On Highway 61 is the new book from Dennis McNally, subtitled Music, Race, and the Evolution of Cultural Freedom, and he’s on the phone with David Lewis to talk about the importance of music during the 1960’s civil rights turbulence.

Alive Inside is described as "a joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity." The film was awarded the Audience Award for US Documentary at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. Special screening events are coming to the Kenwood and Mariemont Theatres and feature special Q&A sessions with the filmmakers.

Cincinnati-born filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the experiences of individuals around the U.S. who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music. His camera reveals the uniquely human connection we find in music and how its healing power can triumph where prescription medication falls short. 

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center emphasizes it's not for everyone, but a few families are taking advantage of a new way to remember their critically ill children.

Music therapist Brian Schreck  records the child's heartbeat and uses it as a metronome or drumbeat while he mixes it with songs that are important to the patient or the family.

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