music

Glen Phillips from the band Toad the Wet Sprocket stopped in our studio on St. Patrick's Day when he was in town for a concert at the Ludlow Garage. 

Coming to the First Lutheran Church in Over the Rhine is the Ohio Sacred Harp Singing Convention, a gathering of fans and musicians of this unique choral music. 

Author Taylor Barton and her husband, guitarist G.E. Smith (Saturday Night Live, Hall & Oates, Bob Dylan, etc.) along will illustrator Dana Cooper have created a children's book that integrates music into the experience. 

The Greenwich in Walnut Hills is currently hosting a group art show called Music To My Soul, featuring photography, painting, and sculpture. 

The life and career of music legend Paul Simon is detailed in the new biography, Homeward Bound: The Life of Paul Simon.

Ann Thompson

Cedar Village, a retirement community in Mason, is noticing specific iPod playlists are triggering memories in some of its residents with dementia. Cedar Village will hold a free public screening of "Alive Inside," a film that shows evidence of the same thing, on October 25 at 7:30 p.m..

Businesses know they need to pay licensing fees for music played in their establishment. 

September is King Records Month in Cincinnati. WVXU will pay tribute with four special episodes of Lee Hay's Blues show (Saturday nights at 11pm starting September 3). 

Local musician Chuck Brisbin is in our studio with Bob Nave to preview the upcoming Cincy Blues Fest

Commentary: The Ohio Phonograph Company

Jul 8, 2016

The Ohio Phonograph Company was the first record company to operate out of Cincinnati, and its history involves legal battles with the father of the phonograph, Thomas Edison

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Imagine it's 1971, you and some high school buddies record a couple songs. You sell the 45 to your friends, put it in a few jukeboxes in your hometown and... life just goes on. Then 45 years later, you get an unexpected email.

Starting April 15, the Constella Festival brings a diverse schedule or art and music back to an array of venues around the city.

Our contributor David Lewis is the chair of the Cincinnati chapter of the Association for Recorded Sound Collections and gives lectures each month at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County about this area’s long, distinguished history of recording sound and music.

While Playboy may be changing some of the visual content in its magazine, there’s no denying the impact it has made to music, particularly jazz, over the decades.  Ron Esposito talks with Patty Farmer, the author of the new book Playboy Swings: How Hugh Hefner and Playboy Changed the Face of Music.

It just may be a universal truth: one of the best ways to reach teens is with and through music. The Music Resource Center— - Cincinnati is a multifaceted teen program that uses recording and performing arts, as well as life skills mentoring, to create a sense of empowerment and accomplishment in the urban community.

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