murder

Hamilton County Sheriff's Department

Former University of Cincinnati Police Officer Ray Tensing will face trial on November 16 on a charge of murder.

Tana Weingartner

A hand-cuffed Ray Tensing appeared in a Hamilton County Common Pleas courtroom Thursday morning and entered a not guilty plea to a charge of murder and was slapped by the judge with a $1 million bond.

Hamilton County Sheriff's Department

 

 A Hamilton County grand jury has indicted a University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing for murder in the shooting death of Samuel DuBose in a July 19 traffic stop.

The shooting was, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joseph T. Deters said, the most “asinine” and “senseless” act he has ever seen a police officer commit.

“I’ve been doing this for over 30 years,’’ Deters said in a press conference early Wednesday afternoon at his office. “It was the purposeful killing of a person. That’s what makes it murder.”

On a cold, drizzly fall afternoon in 1958, a trio of duck hunters stumbled on the charred remains of Cincinnati resident Louise Bergen. When investigators learned that her estranged husband was living with an older divorcée, Edythe Klumpp, they wasted no time in questioning her. When she failed a lie detector test, Edythe spilled out a confession. Although it did not fit the physical evidence, she was found guilty and sentenced to death in the electric chair.

Governor Michael V. DiSalle put his political career on the line to save Edythe from the death penalty, personally interviewing the prisoner while she was under the influence of "truth serum." But was it the truth? Richard O Jones separates the facts from the fiction in this comprehensive book about the Klumpp murder in Cincinnati's Savage Seamstress: The Shocking Edythe Klumpp Murder Scandal.

Back in the 1890’s, Pearl Bryan was brutally murdered in one of the more grisly, yet fascinating, crimes in Kentucky history. That story is now recounted by author James McDonald in his book The Perils of Pearl Bryan, and he’s on the phone Lee Hay to discuss this story.

Cincinnati Magazine’s Associate Managing Editor Amy Brownlee has a fascinating article in the October issue about the 2009 murder of 17 year-old Travis White in Covington, and his 14 year-old girlfriend, Emily Ball, who was found guilty for arranging the murder. Mark Perzel and the writer discuss the background of this case and what may happen in early October when Ball, who is now 18, has a state-mandated resentencing hearing.