Mitt Romney

mitt romney
Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

I found out years ago how to get under the skin of former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, now a candidate for the U.S. Senate in Utah.

Top Takeaways From Tuesday's Primary

Jun 28, 2018
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
Seth Wenig / AP

Tuesday's primary results shake things up, as progressive liberals in the Democratic Party show their strength; candidates endorsed by President Donald Trump come out ahead; and former presidential candidate Mitt Romney easily wins the GOP nomination for the Senate in Utah.    

Ohio's 18 members of the Electoral College - all pledged to vote for President Obama and Vice President Biden - meet at noon Monday at the Statehouse in Columbus to do their duty.

Lists of 18 electors were submitted by both political parties before the election. Since Obama won Ohio on Nov. 6 with 50.7 percent of the vote, the 18 people submitted by the Democrats will take their seats in the Ohio Senate chamber Monday. 

Now that the votes are officially counted, it’s time to empty the notebook on the 2012 election and turn the page. Here are  some parting thoughts:


Big Blue: One of the enduring myths of American politics, if you talk to many pundits and politicos around the country, is that Cincinnati is rock-solid Republican country.


Maybe they confuse the city with the county and the region as a whole, which definitely has a red due. Or maybe it goes back to the fact that the Taft political dynasty came from the Queen City.

The only relatively close ballot issue in Hamilton County in the Nov. 6 election - Issue 4, which sets Cincinnati city council terms at four years instead of two - picked up votes in the official vote count released this morning and passed easily.

President Obama, too, picked up votes and widened his lead over Republican Mitt Romney in Hamilton County.

When all the provisional ballots and overseas and military ballots were added, Issue 4 passed with 51.4 percent of the vote. The unofficial election night total had the issue passing with 51 percent.

Ohio Democrats were feeling pretty good Wednesday morning, once the votes had been tallied Tuesday night.
 

They managed to edge out a win in the Buckeye State for President Obama – 50.18 percent of the unofficial vote count for Obama, 48.18 percent for Mitt Romney.


And they managed to get Ohio’s Democratic senator, Sherrod Brown, re-elected over Republican challenger Josh Mandel, despite an avalanche of Super PAC money blanketing the state with TV ads trying to tear Brown down.

Four years ago, politicos on both sides were stunned when the formerly rock-solid Hamilton County was won by Barack Obama by a margin of 29,683 votes, taking 54 percent of the county to 46 percent for GOP nominee John McCain.

This year, the GOP and the Romney-Ryan campaign rolled the dice on winning back Hamilton County, one of the handful of linchpin counties that can make or break a presidential campaign in Ohio.

Again, though, they lost.

The race between President Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney in the key battleground state of Ohio is a toss-up, according to the final Ohio Poll released Monday morning by the University of Cincinnati's Institute for Policy Research.

The poll had support for Obama at 50 percent, while Romney's support stood at 48.5 percent. Another 1.5 percent of those polled said they would vote for another candidate.

Electing Mitt Romney would be a return to policies that have failed in the past and “crashed our economy,’’ President Obama told a full house crowd of 13,500 at the University of Cincinnati’s Fifth Third Arena Sunday night.

The highly charged-up crowd, that was entertained before and after the president’s speech by legendary recording artist Stevie Wonder, roared its approval when Obama appealed to them to help him win the election that takes place on Tuesday and appears now to be too close to call.

Here we go again.


We’ve seen this movie before.
 

Eight years ago on election night, President George W. Bush was sweating it out in the White House, watching states turn red or blue in what was obviously to be a close race with Democrat John Kerry.


Ohio’s returns kept going back and forth – Kerry in the lead, then Bush, then Kerry again.
The Bush team was sweating bullets. It was going to come down to Ohio.


Finally, late into the night – Ohio was called for Bush.

Golf  legend Jack Nicklaus will be the draw Sunday morning when the Commit to Mitt Express bus joins tail

gaters outside Paul Brown Stadium before the Bengals game.

Nicklaus, who will travel the state Sunday stumping for the Romney-Ryan ticket, will be in parking lot E of Paul Brown Stadium at 10:30 a.m. Joining him for the get-out-the-vote event will be Hamilton County GOP chairman Alex Triantafilou, Hamilton County commissioners Greg Hartmann and Chris Monzel, and Hamilton County prosecutor Joe Deters.

Michael Keating

Before a fired-up, massive crowd that waited hours to hear him, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney told a crowd of 30,000 at West Chester’s The Square of Center Pointe that he represents “real change” and that he needs them to help him win the key state of Ohio Tuesday.


“Your state is the one I am counting on,’’ said Romney, who trails Barack Obama by a small margin in some Ohio polls.  “This is the state we have to win.”

Four years ago, then-senator Barack Obama held a rally at the University of Cincinnati on the Sunday before the election, his final stop in Cincinnati before going on to win Ohio and the White House two days later.

This year, Obama - now locked in a tight re-election campaign where Ohio will play a crucial role - will return to the same Sunday for a rally at UC's Fifth Third Arena in what is likely to be his final campaign appearance in the area before Tuesday's election.

President Obama - who had originally planned to be in Cincinnati Wednesday - will hold a campaign event here Sunday as part of a weekend push through key battleground states.

And First Lady Michelle Obama is planning on a rally Saturday afternoon on the campus of Miami University in Oxford, the alma mater of GOP running mate Paul Ryan.

President Obama holds a two percentage point lead over Republican Mitt Romney in the Ohio Poll released Wednesday afternoon by the University of Cincinnati's Institute for Policy Research.

That is well within the poll's margin of error of plus or minus 2.9 percent, meaning the race in Ohio is extremely close and the end result is a toss-up.

The poll had Obama with 48 percent support to 46 percent for Romney.

President Obama, who suspended personal campaigning this week while he dealt with the aftermath of the storm that devastated large parts of the east coast, will return to the campaign trail Friday in the key battleground state of Ohio, where the polls show him in a dead heat with Mitt Romney.

There is no official word yet from the Obama-Biden campaign on re-scheduling the president's rally that was scheduled for this morning at Duke Energy Convention Center in Cincinnati. That was canceled by the White House Tuesday, but could well be re-scheduled.

Friday night - only three days before the election - Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan are bringing their campaign to Butler County, one of the deepest mines of GOP votes in the Buckeye State, for a rally in West Chester.

The rally - which also features the presidential candidate's wife, Ann Romney - will be at The Square at Unon Centre, 9285 Centre Point Drive, West Chester.

The doors open at 4:30 p.m., with the program set to begin at 7 p.m.

It is a ticketed event. Tickets are available at http://www.mittromney.com/ohio.

Ohio is the birthplace of aviation, but automobiles are driving this presidential election in the Buckeye State.


Specifically, the 2009 move by the federal government to save General Motors and Chrysler from going down the drain. The auto industry “bailout,” as the Romney campaign likes to call it. The Obama campaign prefers the term “rescue.”


There is really no way to adequately describe how critical Ohio is to the question Americans will decide in nine days – who will occupy the Oval Office at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue for the next four years.

Cincinnati Fire Department officials estimated the crowd at Jet Machine at about 4,000.

Most were in the warehouse where Romney is to speak momentarily; others were in an overflow room next door.

Sen. Rob Portman, who was considered as Romney's running mate, is introducing Romney to the crowd now.

Portman made a pitch for early voting.

"They're open for business now,'' Portman said. "What do you say that after this, we all get in our cars and go down to Broadway (the location of county board of elections) and cast our ballots."  

The race between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama in the key state of Ohio is “tight as a tick” and likely to stay that way right up to the end, a Romney campaign spokesman said before the GOP candidate’s event at a Bond Hill milling plant Thursday.
 

“In the last 12 days, it is going to be the candidate who is best able to identify and mobilize his supporters who is going to win Ohio,’’ said Chris Maloney, a spokesman for the Romney campaign in Ohio.

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney will meet with supporters to talk about jobs and the economy Thursday morning at a machining and milling plant in Bond Hill.

Romney will appear at Jet Machine on Steger Drive in Bond Hill, a high-tech machinist plant that does work for the military, the aerospace industry and the oil and gas industry.

It is a ticketed event; and tickets are available at www.mittromney.com/OH or by calling (614) 547-2290.

Tomorrow afternoon, Romney's running mate, Paul Ryan, wil be making an appearance at Cleveland State University.

Both the Obama-Biden and Romney-Ryan campaigns are holding watch parties tonight for the presidential candidates' third and final debate.

Former Bengal linebacker Anthony Munoz, a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, will be the featured guest at a Romney-Ryan watch party at the original Montgomery Inn, 9440 Montgomery Road, Montgomery. It begns at 8 p.m.

Martin O'Malley, Maryland's Democratic governor, and Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory will join local Obama supporters for a watch party at 8:30 p.m. at Cincy's on Sixth, 41 E. 6th St., downtown.

President Obama leads GOP challenger Mitt Romney by five percentage points in the critical swing state of Ohio, according to a Quinnipiac University/CBS News/New York Times poll released Monday morning.

Former Cincinnati Bengals head coach Sam Wyche will be tail-gating with the Romney-Ryan "Commit to Mitt Early Vote Express" bus outside Paul Brown Stadium before tonight's nationally-televised Bengals-Steelers game.

Wyche is expected to join the Romney-Ryan bus, which is traveling the state promoting early voting for the GOP presidential tickets, at 5:30 p.m. in parking lot D near Paul Brown Stadium.

Wyche coached the Bengals from 1984 until 1991. He held the record for most wins by a head coach (64) until he was overtaken by Marvin Lewis, the current head coach, in 2011.

Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has settled the hash and allowed in-person voting at Ohio boards of Elections on the final three days before the Nov. 6 election to go forward, there is only one question worth asking.


Was it worth the fight the Obama-Biden campaign put up to stop Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted, a Republican, from doing away with those three days?


Depends on who you ask.


If you ask the Obama-Biden campaign and its Democratic allies, the answer is an unqualified “yes.”

GOP vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan stops at Cincinnati's Lunken Airport early Monday afternoon for a rally.

The event will take place at Landmark Aviation South, 358 Wilmer Avenue.

Doors for the ticketed event will open at 10 a.m.

Tickets are available until 6 p.m. Sunday at the Eastgate GOP Victory Center at 813 Eastgate South Drive; or by logging on to www.mittromney.com/OH.

Ohio, you may make history on the night of Nov. 6.


You may elect a new president without giving him your 18 electoral votes.


Consider this rather remarkable truism of American political history:


No Republican presidential candidate – going all the way back to the first Republican president, Abraham Lincoln in 1860 – has won the White House without winning Ohio.


Mitt Romney could be the first.


This is not to say he will lose Ohio; he may, in fact, win the Buckeye State.

First Lady Michelle Obama will hold Ohio campaign events Monday in Delaware and Cleveland Monday, two days after Mitt Romney makes stops in Lebanon and Portsmouth.

The First Lady will hold a noon hour rally Monday at Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware and a 5 p.m. event at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland - both rallies aimed at encouraging college students to vote early and encourage their friends to do so.

But, first, Romney will be campaigning in Ohio Saturday.

One could hardly blame President Obama for doing a bit of crowing Friday when he spoke to a rain-soaked crowd of several  thousand at Cleveland State University.


He had just learned, as had the rest of the nation, that the Bureau of Labor Statistics had new numbers showing the national unemployment rate had dropped from 8.1 percent in August to 7.8 percent in September – the lowest jobless rate since January 2009, the month he took office.

The campaigns of both President Obama and Republican Mitt Romney were hitting the streets of Cincinnati for some old-fashioned door-knocking and phone-banking.

Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Westwood, joined with Hamilton County GOP officials and local tea party leaders Saturday morning at the Romney Victory Center in Colerain Township to kick off a day of grassroots voter outreach.

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