Looking Up

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Ohioan John Glenn, the first man to orbit the earth, will be honored with the opening of the John Glenn Astronomy Park inside the Hocking Hills State Park in southeastern Ohio.

Photo by Werner Klug/darksky.org

It might not be the first kind of pollution you think of when you hear the word, but there are serious environmental hazards associated with light pollution.

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In this episode of Looking Up, it's been the subject of books, movies, TV shows, and a myriad of urban legends and country myths. Is there life beyond the planet Earth?

Our hosts, Dean Regas and Anna Hehman from the Cincinnati Observatory, delve in to the facts, science, and pop culture of alien life.

ira flatow
@scifri / Instagram

Editor's note: Post-show, Flatow will host a live chat on WVXU's Facebook page starting at 4:45 p.m. We invite all to tune in and ask questions. 

Ira Flatow broadcasts his "Science Friday" show from WVXU-FM 2-4 p.m. Friday before taping interviews Saturday at Miami University in Oxford.

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In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman talk about Neil Armstrong - the Ohio native, NASA astronaut, first man on the moon, UC professor – who will soon be the subject of a major Hollywood biopic starring Ryan Gosling.

The movie is based on the biography First Man written by this episode's guest, James R. Hansen.

In this episode of Looking Up, there are a myriad of ways to try and explain scientific concepts and answer questions about science. Adam Cole, a reporter for the NPR Science Desk and host/animator of their video series Skunk Bear, joins Dean Regas and Anna Hehman to explain exactly what Skunk Bear is and the unique ways it tries to convey science to its viewers.

In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman talk about the growing number of exoplanets being discovered, thanks to advance telescopes like the Keppler and Hubble. The TRAPPIST-1 system is the closest to our solar system and Sean Carey, the manager of the Spitzer Science Center which has the Spitzer Telescope in space, is the special guest.

In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman are talking space exploration and the Mars Rover with Emily Lakdawalla, senior editor and blogger for The Planetary Society and planetary.org, and author of the soon-to-be-released book The Design and Engineering of Curiosity: How the Mars Rover Performs Its Job.

In this episode of Looking Up, the man who makes science sexy every Friday afternoon. Ira Flatow, the host of public radio's "Science Friday," joins hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman to talk about his long-running show, some of his favorite topics, and most importantly, his favorite constellation.

davasobel.com

In this episode of Looking Up, the important contributions of women in science have long been understood within the scientific community, but the public's awareness was raised by the best selling book and movie "Hidden Figures."

Now, another group of women scientists are being spotlighted in the book "The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars" and the author, Dava Sobel, joins Dean Regas and Anna Hehman.

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In this episode of Looking Up, predicting the weather is a science, albeit not always an exact science. Hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman talk weather forecasting with Jason Meyers, digital meteorologist and video content creator for the EW Scripps Co.

In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman share memories of some of their favorite science shows growing up before welcoming one of their favorites, very special guest Paul Zaloom who portrayed Beakman in the mid-90's show Beakman's World.

Provided

The annual Geminid meteor shower peaks tonight and early tomorrow. With up to 120 meteors per hour shooting across the night sky, it's expected to be one of the best celestial shows of the year.

In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman get ready for holiday gift giving by talking about the different types of telescopes out there for new and veteran astronomers, Dean talks about his first telescope, then they welcome Sean Walker, Equipment Editor from Sky & Telescope magazine for hints on the best gear available.

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In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman talk about living on Mars and the possibility of some life forms living under the surface.

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In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman discuss space travel and Dean reveals his favorite astronaut. Then they are joined in studio by Captain Scott Kelly, veteran astronaut and the man who spent a full year living on the International Space Station. 

In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman discuss pop culture and space, from the first science fiction book written in 2 A.D. to movies that get it right, or close to right, like The Martian, to others who seemed content to ignore all scientific logic, like Armageddon.

Their special guest is Lauren Worley who, for 5 years, served as NASA's press secretary and senior advisor.

badastronomy.com

In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman dip their toe into doomsday prophecies and space hoaxes with guest Phil Plait, better known as The Bad Astronomer

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In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman revisit August's total solar eclipse, including finding out where Dean wound up viewing it and the crowd that descended on Anna at the Cincinnati Observatory.

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In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman say good-bye to the successful Cassini spacecraft as it prepares to crash into the surface of Saturn. The mission's Deputy Project Scientist Scott Edgington explains why Cassini is ending this way and some of what has been learned since taking off in 1997. They also answer another Kid Question.

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In this episode of Looking Up, hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman discuss Pluto with Alice Bowman, the Mission Operations Manager for the New Horizons mission from Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, then Anna has a question for Dean from the Cincinnati Observatory's Crank File.

2017 Total Solar Eclipse Information

Aug 15, 2017

Coming Monday, August 21, the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse is expected to be one of the most viewed astronomical events ever! It's the first eclipse that will be seen from coast to coast in 99 years.

With the path of totality (full darkness) stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, each of the 48 contiguous states will experience some percentage of the eclipse. In the Greater Cincinnati area, we will be around 90% coverage.

There are right and wrong (very wrong) ways to view an eclipse.  Please take a look at this information from our friends at the Cincinnati Observatory to make sure you are ready to safely enjoy the eclipse.

To know more about eclipses, safe viewing options, terminology, some personal experiences and more, we have three great listening options for you:

pbs.org

In this episode of Looking Up, final preparations for the upcoming total solar eclipse are discussed when hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman welcome James Albury, the director of Santa Fe College's Kika Silva Pla Planetarium and Dean's co-host on the PBS series Star Gazers. Plus they'll answer another kid question.

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The upcoming total solar eclipse has astronomers and non-astronomers alike excited as the path of totality will bisect the US from Oregon to South Carolina. 

NASA/JPL-Caltech

A University of Cincinnati professor is helping NASA plan the next mission to Mars, in search of ancient life. Dr. Andrew Czaja is among a team of scientists determining where on Mars to land the most sophisticated rover to date. Part of the Mars 2020 mission is to collect rock samples for evidence the Red Planet once sustained microbial life.

exoplanets.nasa.gov

In this first episode of Looking Up: hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman welcome listeners to the podcast, discuss exoplanets, have a conversation with astronomer Kevin Wagner who recently discovered an exoplanet, and answer a kid question.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

On July 12 Cincinnati Public Radio introduces a new podcast, "Looking Up," with the Cincinnati Observatory's Dean Regas and Anna Hehman. The first podcast created exclusively by Cincinnati Public Radio separate from its on-air programming, "Looking Up" will cover the latest astronomical discoveries, science and technology, and interesting facts about the stars and planets, all in a fun, down to Earth way.

Looking Up Trailer

Jul 5, 2017

Looking Up, the first original podcast from Cincinnati Public Radio, debuts July 12 on iTunes and wvxu.org.