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Greater Cincinnati's Water Technology Innovation Cluster Confluence is putting on a private summit Wednesday to address ways of keeping harmful algae blooms out of the local water supply.

Just this August a toxic algal bloom in Lake Erie near the Toledo water intake prevented nearly 500,000 residents from getting their drinking water for three days.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The Executive Director of Greater Cincinnati Water Works and the Metropolitan Sewer District, Tony Parrot, will participate in a national discussion on U.S. water infrastructure Wednesday in Washington D.C.

Parrot joins the U.S. EPA's Nancy Stoner, Veolia Water North America and Mark Strauss with American Waterin the Value of Water Coalition's national panel discussion to help other communities deal with crumbling water and wastewater infrastructure.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Think of it as a big laboratory where new water technology is tested. The EPA's Testing and Evaluation Center, right next to the Metropolitan Sewer District, played host to a group of people who wanted to figure out better ways to solve their water problems.

Richard Seline  with the Texas Water Cluster Initiative and others are now armed with new information after their visit to Cincinnati. He says, "You kind of see around the country who's doing what cool things with technology."

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The chemical spill affecting water supplies in a large portion of West Virginia has the Greater Cincinnati Water Works keeping a close eye on local water quality.

"Currently the spill has not reached the Cincinnati area," says Communications Officer Michele Ralston.

The spill occurred in the Elk River which is a tributary of the Kanawha River. The Kanawha flows into the Ohio River at Point Pleasant, West Virginia.

Good Morning, TriState

Oct 7, 2013

As part of our Liquid Assets partnership with WCPO, WVXU’s Ann Thompson and Tana Weingartner joined Brian Yocono for Good Morning, TriState. If you missed the initial segments, check them out now.

WCPO and WVXU explore Cincinnati's biggest untapped resource - water:

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