Identity theft

The recent massive data breach of health insurance company Anthem'’s customer and employee records once again highlights the need for security of digital information by both corporations and individuals. Hackers accessed tens of millions of records, which included Social Security numbers, names and other information criminals can use to steal a person’'s identity. Joining us to discuss how individuals can protect themselves and their digital information, and what to do if you are notified your records have been compromised are Bogdan "Bo" Vykhovanyuk, assistant vice president in the University of Cincinnati Office of Information Security; Dr. James Walden, associate professor at the Northern Kentucky University College of Informatics; and Dave Hatter, solution architect and partner with Definity Partners, LLC.


Definity Partners, LLC

  According to a recent report, there were 12.6 million victims of identity fraud in 2012. And increasingly, criminals are taking advantage of the poor security measures smartphone and tablet  owners use to gain access to important personal  information. Many users keep banking information on their phones or check their bank accounts via public Wi-Fi. And many people leave their phones unattended at their office  or in their parked cars.

A federal grand jury has indicted seven people for identity theft.  U.S. Attorney Carter Stewart says six of them are citizens of Zimbabwe who lived in the Cincinnati area at one time. He says they used the stolen identities to obtain millions in fraudulent income tax returns:

"The scheme was so efficient and well planned that they often had the refunds in hand before the actual taxpayers even filed their legitimate tax returns."