Howard Wilkinson

 

  You can’t really say that the people of Ohio’s 8th Congressional District – an overwhelmingly Republican stretch of land – despised their congressman, former House Speaker John Boehner of West Chester.

After all, they elected him to Congress every two years from 1990 through 2014, never with less than 60 percent of the vote. In 2012, the Democrats in the district didn’t even bother to field a candidate. They looked at it and said, what’s the point?

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Political pundits were calling it Super Tuesday II. Yesterday, voters in five states – including Ohio – chose the candidate they want representing their party in the November presidential election. Ohio Governor John Kasich won his home state’s primary, picking up his first victory and all 66 Ohio delegates. And increasing the chances of a contested convention in Cleveland this July. Hillary Clinton won the Democratic primary in Ohio.

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Former Army Ranger and Miami County businessman Warren Davidson appears headed for victory in a 15-candidate field for the 8th Ohio Congressional District seat once held by John Boehner.all

With all of the district's 579 precincts reporting, Davidson had 33 percent in the early returns.  State Rep. Tim Derickson of Butler County's Hanover Township was in second with 24 percent, while State Sen. Bill Beagle of Tipp City in Miami County, had 20 percent. 

All of the other candidates finished well under 10 percent. 

Davidson could not be reached for comment. 

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Former judge Norbert Nadel has defeated Cincinnati council member Charlie Winburn in a hotly-contested primary for Hamilton County recorder.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked Monday morning with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik about Tuesday's Ohio presidential primary and how it will make or break Ohio Gov. John Kasich's bid for the GOP nomination. That's why Donald Trump is working hard to stop Kasich in Ohio. 

In a speech before a wildly enthusiastic crowd, billionaire and GOP presidential contender Donald J. Trump bounced from one subject to another in a stream-of-consciousness speech.

Some of it was familiar ground – criticism of the news media, Hillary Clinton, Ohio Gov. John Kasich (his principal opponent in Tuesday’s Ohio primary) and his insistence that, as president, he will build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico “and make Mexico pay for it.”

  SHARONVILLE - In his nearly eight months of campaigning for the GOP presidential nomination, Ohio Gov. John Kasich has been, as he described it to hundreds of friendly suburban Republicans here Saturday morning, “unrelentingly positive.”

He has not engaged in the name-calling and yelling that has marked most of the televised GOP candidate debates. But he has also never called out his chief rival in Tuesday’s critical Ohio primary, billionaire Donald J. Trump, for the angry tone he has set for his campaign or the violence that often erupts at his campaign events.

UPDATED 9:23 AM SATURDAY:

A release from the Donald J. Trump Campaign now lists a 2:00 rally in West Chester at the Savannah Center on Chappell Crossing Boulevard.  Tickets available here:

ORIGINAL STORY: 

A mid-day Sunday rally for presidential contender Donald J. Trump at the Duke Energy Convention Center has been called off.

Eric Deters, who was the Northern Kentucky chairman of the Trump campaign told WVXU that there were "some problems" with the Duke Energy Center that could not be worked out, but he said the campaign is still trying to schedule a rally with Trump in Cincinnati before Tuesday's primary election.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Donald J. Trump, locked in a critical battle for Ohio’s 66 Republican delegates in Tuesday’s primary election, will crisscross the state this weekend, including stops for both in Cincinnati.

Thursday morning, Linda Caudill, the Hamilton County chair of Trump’s campaign, said the campaign signed a contract “late last night” with the Duke Energy Convention Center to hold a Sunday rally.

She said she had no details on the rally but said they are expected to be released by the Trump campaign later today. This story will be updated.

For nearly a quarter of a century, voters in the 8th Congressional District of Ohio sent Republican John Boehner back to the U.S. House by huge margins every two years.

It gave Boehner the kind of clout that allowed him to become Speaker of the House in January, 2010.

All of that ended last fall, when the West Chester Republican was pushed into resignation by a rebellious House GOP caucus, many of whom thought he was too eager to compromise with the Democrat in the White House.

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