Howard Wilkinson

US Congress

There I was, 9-year-old me, standing in the early morning light of our family's backyard in Dayton, Ohio, on Feb. 20, 1962, staring up at the sky and hoping against hope that I could get a glimpse of my hero, John H. Glenn Jr., streaking across the sky in his tiny Mercury space capsule.

The last three election cycles have been miserable for Democrats in Ohio. Hillary Clinton failed to win the state this year, and, in 2014 and 2010, the Democrats were completely shut of all of Ohio's statewide constitutional offices. Can they make a comeback in 2018's mid-term election? WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Jay Hanselman about it on Morning Edition Monday. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who tried and failed to win the GOP presidential nomination and then spent the rest of the campaign season turning his back on the eventual winner, Donald Trump. What does this mean for Kasich's future in politics? 

For a period of time even longer than the Chicago Cubs' 108-year drought between World Series championships, Ohio has been the bellwether of this country's presidential politics.

When Ohio went for Donald Trump on Nov. 8 it marked the 29th time in the past 31 presidential elections that Ohio went with the winner, a record unmatched by any other state in that period of time.

That's the mark of a bellwether state.

But it's not the only mark.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

 

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition, we present an in-depth discussion of the developments behind the headlines. 

Naturally, Democrats in Hamilton County were as shocked and disbelieving as Democrats anywhere else Tuesday night when Donald Trump won the White House, even though nearly all the indicators leading up to the election pointed to a Hillary Clinton victory.

It will take them some time to get over that; and some considerable time to figure out how they can fight back, as members of a party that doesn’t control either the executive or legislative branches of government – and are looking warily at what might happen to the judicial branch.

It's a tough pill to swallow.

Pete Rightmire/WVXU

 

News organizations across the country and around the world summed up Donald Trump's decisive victory over Hillary Clinton to become the nation's 45th president with one word: shocking. 

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The final result of two very close Hamilton County races won't be known for about two weeks until nearly 13,000 provisional ballots are counted.

But the results from Tuesday night's unofficial vote count are unlikely to be reversed.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Democrat Aftab Pureval did something Tuesday night that seemed impossible for the past few generations of Democrats in Hamilton County – he defeated a Winkler in an election.

Issue 44, a large tax levy to infuse money into the Cincinnati Public  Schools and fund a preschool program for 6,000 three- and four-year-olds,  was supported by the vast majority of the school district's voters Tuesday.

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Democratic challenger Denise Driehaus barely edged out Republican incumbent Dennis Deters Tuesday night for a seat on the Hamilton County Board of Commissioners. 

Kathy Groob

One of Northern Kentucky's long-standing political figures,  Joe Meyer, has ousted incumbent Sherry Carran as the mayor of Northern Kentucky's largest city.

Alright, admit it – you've seen the TV ads with the earnest looking young man talking seriously about what he would do if he were elected to be Hamilton County's clerk of courts.

You've seen the duck puppet pop up in the middle of those ads from time to time to squawk "Aftab!" Sort of like the duck in the Aflac commercials.

And, admit it, those commercials have stuck in your head, like an ear worm of a song you can't help but hum to yourself all day. Aftab! Aftab! Aftab!

What is Issue 44 about?

The Cincinnati Public Schools (CPS) has not had a new levy since 2008 and could be facing large deficits in the near future.  A coalition of educators and people in the social service sector called Cincinnati Preschool Promise had been talking in recent years about how to pay for pre-school for every 3- and 4-year-old child in the area.

Obviously, the battle for the White House is at the very top of this year's election fight card.

But coming in a not-too-distant second is a battle that has been brewing since the 2014 election, when Republicans took control of the U.S. Senate after eight years of the Democrats being in power.

At the beginning of the year, Democrats could smell victory in the air – all they had to do was to flip four Republicans seats and they could retake control of the Senate.

That's still a possibility in next Tuesday's election, although it's a tough row to hoe for Democrats.

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