60 Minutes

When “60 Minutes” correspondent Bill Whitaker tells Hannah Morris of Worthington that she doesn’t look like a junkie, she says: “Even Miss America could be a junkie. I mean, anybody can be a junkie.”

Whitaker came to Ohio to report on how widespread the heroin epidemic is in Middle America for “60 Minutes” Sunday (7 p.m., Channel 12, CBS).

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine tells the CBS news magazine that heroin is “the worst drug epidemic I've seen in my lifetime… It just has permeated every segment of society in Ohio. There is no place in Ohio where you can hide from it.”

Drug overdose is the No. 1 cause of accidental deaths in Ohio, says DeWine, who will also appear on “CBS This Morning” Monday (7-9 a.m., Channel 12, CBS). Here’s the CBS release for Sunday’s “60 Minutes” segment:

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Nearly half of the inmates processed at the Hamilton County Justice Center last year had a heroin addiction and detoxed while behind bars. The Sheriff now wants to create a special ward just for addicts with poor over-all health.

The Tri-State region, already dealing with a heroin epidemic, may see an uptick in methamphetamine use because drug dealers are diversifying and giving out free meth samples to their customers.

FBI Director James Comey, in Cincinnati Wednesday to meet with law enforcement officials and talk about violence and drugs among other things, said "Mexican drug traffickers are manufacturing in Mexico huge amounts of highly pure meth and they are looking to gain market share as well and have that sweep (from the western U.S. to the east)."

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Hamilton County's Heroin Task Force has released a strategic plan to address the drug epidemic in the region. 

Commission President Greg Hartmann says coalition members will work on several fronts including interdiction, treatment, and prevention. 

Al Jazeera America

If you live in Northern Kentucky and want to see Soledad O’Brien’s one-hour “Heroin USA” documentary filmed in Northern Kentucky, you’d better have Dish Network or DirecTV.

“Heroin USA: A Soledad O’Brien Special Report” airs 10 p.m. Sunday on the Al Jazeera America channel -- which is not carried by Cincinnati Bell Fioptics or by Time Warner’s Northern Kentucky franchise, the former Insight cable system.

Al Jazeera America

Soledad O’Brien came to Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati suburbs for her one-hour “Heroin USA” documentary because Greater Cincinnati “has recently become the center of the nation’s heroin epidemic," says the show publicist.

“Heroin USA: A Soledad O'Brien Special Report,” airing at 10 p.m. Sunday on the Al Jazeera America network, will be told through three area residents: Olivia DeLand; Sarah Kordenbrock , a former Covington high school volleyball captain; and the late Mike Heffron, who died from a heroin overdose in 2013.

The network describes them this way:

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Two and a half months ago the heroin epidemic got so bad the Hamilton County Sheriff's Department decided to partner with the public. While the problem hasn't gone away, detectives are getting lots of leads and are relentless in their efforts to stop dealers.

Provided / Cincinnati Children's Hosptial Medical Center

Chicago and Buffalo are the latest cities to contact Dr. Scott Wexelblatt, the medical director for newborn services at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, about a program that helps to identify and treat babies exposed to heroin and other drugs.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil deputized members of the county's heroin task force Thursday morning so they are able to make arrests in communities outside their jurisdictions. 

The purpose of deputizing them is to further disrupt the flow the drug, which continues to have a strong hold on the area.

Newtown Police Chief Tom Synan is leading the effort.

"What's big about this is no matter where you are dealing heroin, no matter where your user goes, it's going to come back to you," Synan said. 

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Two Ohio lawmakers are backing a package of bills they say will help crack down on drug overdoses – especially involving heroin, which state stats show is responsible for nearly half of all overdose deaths.