gardening

  It’'s never a sure thing this time of year, but it looks as if we’'ve seen the last of the hard frosts. Most folks have cut their grass at least once or twice already, although it may still be too wet to get your gardens started.

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) has become a popular way for consumers to buy local, seasonal food directly from a farmer. Consumers get access to ultra-fresh foods and are exposed to new foods and ways of cooking, farmers are able to market their products earlier in the year, and both consumers and farmers have the opportunity to build relationships with each other. Joining us to discuss Community Supported Agriculture and to answer your gardening questions are Ryan Doan with Urban Greens; Peter Huttinger, co-owner of Homeadow Song Farm and Director of the Community Garden Program at Turner Farm; and, David Koester, Campbell County Horticulture extension agent.

  Maintaining a garden or landscape takes a lot of time and effort, mulching, weeding and watering, to keep everything healthy and looking good. You’re doing all of that work, why not get a bit more out of it by substituting blueberries, vegetables, herbs, or other edible plants for some of the flowers you typically grow, or maybe add a fruit tree to your yard? Joining us to discuss edible gardening and to answer your questions are apple orchardist Marsha Lindner; Melinda O'Briant Adult Education director at Turner Farm; and, David Koester, Campbell County Horticulture extension agent.

  While spring seems a very long way off, local gardeners are getting ready now to get back outside, doing research, checking out the latest seed and plant offerings and gardening news, and planning what to grow once warmer weather returns.

 We all know the environmental importance of trees. And most homeowners realize they have a significant intrinsic worth as well. The right tree in the proper setting can define a landscape and add significantly to a home’'s resale value. This is the perfect time of year to plant or relocate trees, but picking, positioning and planting a tree takes some careful thought and planning.

  We'’re now into that time of year when gardeners start to ask some hard questions: to prune or not to prune? What fall crops can I plant and harvest before the first freeze? How many gazing globes, concrete geese and solar-powered butterfly lights in the yard are too many?

Provided, Cincinnati Zoo

  Next Thursday, August 28, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden presents its fourth-annual Plant Trials Day, where the zoo shares the results of its testing program. Learn about the best new plants most suitable for our area, and hear presentations by horticulture experts on a variety of gardening topics, perennials, miniature trees, selecting the best plant materials and more. Here to give us a preview of Plant Trials Day are the Director of Horticulture at the Cincinnati Zoo, Steve Foltz, and zoo horticulturist Scott Beuerlein.

  Temperatures in the 90's one week, then it gets unseasonably cool, then we go days without a drop of rain followed by heavy downpours, and then there are the molds, insects, deer, moles and other critters to contend with. Many people consider gardening and yard work relaxing and enjoyable, but maintaining gardens and landscapes around here takes time, effort and experience.

Provided, Cincinnati Parks

The ever-popular Krohn Conservatory butterfly show opened last week, “Pura Vida: Butterflies of Costa Rica” runs through June 22. Krohn General Manager Andrea Schepmann and Regina Edwards, aka "the Bug Lady" at Cincinnati Parks, discuss this year’s Krohn show, and what went into creating “Pura Vida,” a tropical hideaway of exotic plants, cascading waterfalls, colorful parrot fish, mysterious stone sculptures, and 16,000 butterflies.

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