gardening

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Whether you are growing fruits and vegetables or prefer ornamental flowers in your landscaping, this is the time of year pests can invade and quickly damage or destroy your plants. 

deavita.com

More people are growing their own fruits, vegetables and herbs to provide their families with a steady supply of fresh foods. But some backyard gardeners often find they have an over-abundance of produce. And many of them are discovering the value of small market gardening as an extra source of income, or even as a career.

Wikipedia.com

As consumers become more interested in sustainability and learning about how their food is produced, many city dwellers are going beyond growing their own fruits and vegetables and raising chickens, rabbits and other livestock in their yards.

Wikipedia.com

Most crops grown for their fruits, nuts, seeds and fiber require pollination by insects, such as bees and butterflies. These pollinators are responsible for much of the food we eat and play a critical role in ensuring the production of seeds in most flowering plants.

Steve Cummings

Over the last several years, an increasing interest in learning more about where our foods come from and a desire to eat healthier have prompted more people living in urban areas to grow their own fruits and vegetables.

WVXU, Pete Rightmire

Flowers are in bloom, lawns are turning a deep green and spring is in the air. But there is still a chance we could experience hard frosts and even snow before the warm weather finally settles in.

simplebites.net

With the recent arctic air and snow, spring seems a long way off, but now is the time to start planning your garden and deciding how to get the best use of your landscape this year.

www.permaculteurs.com

Permaculture is a system of agricultural and social design principles centered around working with nature, instead of against it, to foster sustainable systems and lifestyles.

  After the strange weather we had this summer, it has been a beautiful fall, so far, prompting even people who don’t like yard work to get outside, rake leaves or work in their gardens. But there is plenty to do now to make the most of the nice weather we have left before the temperatures drop, and prepare our yards and gardens for winter. 

We are accustomed to odd weather in the Tri-state, but this summer has been particularly unusual: heavy rains and unseasonably low temperatures followed by days of intense, dry heat, followed by more rain and cooler days. One morning it’'s August, the next October, then we'’re back to August again. It’'s posed a real challenge to farmers and anyone trying to keep their lawns and gardens healthy.

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