flood

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Hamilton County may have enough flood damage to qualify for federal and state disaster aid. Emergency Management Director Nick Crossley says one building was destroyed, 59 had major damage, and more than 350 had minor damage.

flooded streets in the East End, house in distance
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Time is running out to report flood damage in Hamilton County. Ryan McEwan with Emergency Management said the agency wants reports in by Wednesday so they can turn them over to the state by Friday.

flooded fields seen through trees
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The Ohio River is slowly falling back to pre-flood levels. As communities start to clean up, there are some calling for a fresh look at how human activity affects flooding.

Bill Rinehart

The National Weather Service forecasts the Ohio River at Cincinnati to crest Sunday afternoon at 60.6 feet. Flood stage is 52 feet.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Updated at 2:37 p.m.

The Ohio River continues to rise. The National Weather Service says as of midday Tuesday, it was at 55.2 feet and expected to rise to 55.5 feet before cresting in the evening.  Earlier forecasts put the crest at 56.1 feet coming early Wednesday morning.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The Ohio River is rising.  Scott Hickman with the National Weather Service blames heavy rain.

This week twenty years ago our region experienced one of the worst floods in modern history. While river communities in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana suffered, the hardest hit was the city of Falmouth, Kentucky

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

While receding flood waters are leaving behind plenty of mud and debris, causing big clean-ups along the Ohio, work on Cincinnati's Smale Riverfront Park isn't being affected.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

**Updated March 9**

The Ohio River crested at 53 feet, Sunday, according to the Associated Press.  That's one foot above flood stage.  The river level is expected to fall slowly through the rest of the week.  The National Weather Service is predicting rain on Tuesday, and again Thursday and Friday.

**Original story** 

With plenty of rain and snow this week, area rivers are expected to rise quickly.

In the early days of 1937, the Ohio River, swollen by heavy winter rains, began rising. And rising. And rising.

By the time the waters crested, the Ohio and Mississippi had climbed to record heights. Nearly four hundred people had died, while a million more had run from their homes.

The deluge caused more than half a billion dollars of damage at a time when the Great Depression still battered the nation.

A striking narrative of danger and adventure - The Thousand-Year Flood breathes new life into a fascinating yet little-remembered piece of American story.

Provided

  The Ohio River reached its highest point in recorded history, 79.99 feet, on January 26, 1937. Author and University of Central Arkansas Associate Professor David Welky wrote a definitive book on the tragedy, The Thousand Year Flood: The Ohio-Mississippi disaster of 1937.

Historic flood now detailed in a new book

Jun 21, 2013

Local author Geoff Williams has written an extensive look at one of this area’s major natural disasters. He’s in the studio with our Barbara Gray to talk about his interest and research into the book Washed Away: How the Great Flood of 1913, America's Most Widespread Natural Disaster, Terrorized a Nation and Changed It Forever. While the city of Cincinnati wasn’t terribly impacted, surrounding areas like Loveland, Cleves and Dayton took the brunt.