environment

amazon.com

Gaia Vince is the former editor at Nature magazine who decided to leave her office and travel the world to see how people on the frontline of our changing environment are living. 

Provided

From 1951 until 1989, the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio, about 20 miles northwest of Cincinnati, was a key player in the Cold War, processing uranium for the United States nuclear weapons program. 

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The Mill Creek is a 28-mile long urban river that begins in West Chester, runs though Cincinnati and flows into the Ohio River, just west of downtown. It was declared the worst environmental problem in the Greater Cincinnati area in 1993, unfit for aquatic life and recreation. Since 1995, the Mill Creek Watershed Council of Communities has been working to make improvements to the waterway.

Emily Maxwell | WCPO

The W.C. Beckjord Station power plant, located on the bank of the Ohio River southeast of Cincinnati in New Richmond, began generating electricity in 1952. Duke Energy closed the plant in 2014, but there are still large coal ash ponds on the site containing arsenic, lead and other toxins that pose a potential danger to the environment and drinking water. Local government leaders, the Environmental Protection Agency and Duke Energy are now trying to determine the most effective, safe method to clean up the site and prevent any hazardous material leaking into the Ohio River or other water supplies.

deavita.com

More people are growing their own fruits, vegetables and herbs to provide their families with a steady supply of fresh foods. But some backyard gardeners often find they have an over-abundance of produce. And many of them are discovering the value of small market gardening as an extra source of income, or even as a career.

Dr. George Uetz is a professor of biology at the University of Cincinnati and Alex Sweger is a graduate student and together they have discovered a new species of wolf spider with audible mating songs that sound a lot like a cat purr. Last summer they presented their findings to the Acoustical Society of America. They sat down with Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard to talk about wolf spiders and their mating songs.

Wikipedia.com

Most crops grown for their fruits, nuts, seeds and fiber require pollination by insects, such as bees and butterflies. These pollinators are responsible for much of the food we eat and play a critical role in ensuring the production of seeds in most flowering plants.

Cincinnati Council could approve a resolution Wednesday committing the city to make decisions protecting the environmental health of residents, especially the most vulnerable.  

The Education and Entrepreneurship committee approved the item Tuesday.

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The recent crisis in Flint, Michigan brought attention to how many water pipes in America are made of lead, — but lead exists elsewhere and exposure to it can cause serious health problems. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the most common source of lead poisoning is from lead-based paint and contaminated dust in old buildings.

wheatoncollege.edu

Dr. John Kricher is longtime professor of biology at Wheaton College who teaches courses in ecology, ornithology, and vertebrate evolution.

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden kicks-off its annual Barrows Conservation Lecture Series this month. Over the years, the series has brought dozens of internationally acclaimed scientists, explorers and naturalists into town to address wildlife issues and global conservation efforts.

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Daily environmental factors, such as chemical exposure through food and products, play a role in a woman’'s likelihood of developing breast cancer. The University of Cincinnati Center for Environmental Genetics and the Breast Cancer Registry of Greater Cincinnati board are hosting an event, “Looking Upstream for Better Breast  Health,” to discuss environment and breast cancer.

pixabay.com

The third annual Great Tree Summit will take place Saturday, February 13, at the Cincinnati Zoo. The summit is presented by Taking Root, the campaign to restore our region’s tree canopy with a goal of planting two million trees by 2020. 

Noel Rowe grew up in Cincinnati, worked at the Cincinnati Zoo as a young man, and his family has a long history of supporting the local environment – in fact, Rowe Woods at the Cincinnati Nature Center is named after his grandfather. 

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Update: 3 p.m.

In the next few weeks or months the Cincinnati Archdiocese will be distributing materials aimed at getting parishioners to be more green.

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