education

Beginning with only eleven students and a staff of three Sisters of Charity, a young priest, Father Henry Waldhaus, embarked on a mission which would produce the first accredited high school for the deaf in Ohio. This year, St. Rita School for the Deaf is celebrating its 100th anniversary.

Fixing the troubled educational system is one of the critical issues facing our country, but where do you start and what direction do you go? International education leader and author Sir Ken Robinson delved into the topic in a 2006 TED talk, How Schools Kill Creativity, which has had more than 31 million views and generated thousands of queries on how to solve this problem.

A group of professors and students from Mount St. Joseph University visited Cuba for an educational and cultural trip last month. 

  Thirty-five highly respected educators from the United States and Canada have been selected as this year'’s Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Education Grosvenor Teacher Fellows. The Fellows will take expeditions to locations such as Iceland, Greenland and Antarctica, for hands-on experience, professional development, and what most would say, a trip of a lifetime.

Adjusting curriculum for kids in poverty

Mar 25, 2015
Mark Urycki / StateImpact Ohio

In January, an analysis of federal data found that for the first time in at least 50 years more than half of the public school children in America are living in poverty. In Ohio, the number is only 39 percent, but it still concerns school officials here who know that poor kids come to school carrying extra burdens. In recent years education officials have been looking to brain research for answers.

Legislators listening to concerns about time spent on standardized tests

Mar 5, 2015
Tana Weingartner / WVXU

If you talk to a school student, a teacher or a parent these days, you are likely to hear one complaint loud and clear: there is too much testing under new federal education standards. Lawmakers are also hearing that message. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports on what they are doing about it.

Provided / Mount St. Joseph University

Mount St. Joseph University is searching for a new leader. President Tony Aretz announced his resignation Tuesday. He'll officially step down at the end of the academic year.

In a statement Aretz writes, "I have been able to complete many of the goals I had when arriving at the Mount and throughout the rest of my career, will reflect upon the many accomplishments we achieved with great pride.”

The university says the move is Aretz' decision and he plans to explore other opportunities.

  A teacher in a typical classroom is challenged with educating students with a range of learning skills and abilities, some average, some below average, some above. And teachers often need to focus on the students who are struggling to keep up with the rest of the class. But what about the students who are far ahead of their classmates, the ones who never seem to need any help? Joining us to discuss the needs of gifted children are Psychologist Dr.

  The ever-increasing volume of information produced each day that touches virtually every aspect of our lives demands a continued supply of trained professionals to properly manage how that information is processed, stored, distributed and protected. A recent survey showed information technology hiring will increase up to 26% this year.

Boys and Girls Clubs

Jan 30, 2015

Boys & Girls Clubs of America had its beginnings in 1860 with three women in Hartford, Connecticut who believed that boys needed a positive alternative to roaming the streets. Since then the organization has expanded, with clubs across the country providing a safe place for kids to learn, grow, and reach their full potential. Here to talk about the mission and some of the programs offered locally are Michelle Seither, Operations director for the Boys & Girls Clubs of West Chester/Liberty, and Boys and Girls Club of Greater Cincinnati Director of Operations Bill Bresser

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