Civil Rights Movement

Carl Van Vechten Photographs collection at the Library of Congress

This spring, the Quaker Heritage Center at Wilmington College is holding a series of talks and musical performances to highlight the power of solidarity and resistance among African-Americans, abolitionists, and Quakers. The programs address the complicated dynamics of white and African-American abolitionists who were entangled in systems of privilege and oppression throughout the 19th century.

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Historians cite December 1, 1955 as the beginning of the modern civil rights movement. That was the day Rosa Parks, an African-American woman, was arrested for refusing to move to the back of the bus in Montgomery, Alabama. But for many, the fight for civil rights was sparked by individual, personal incidents of intolerance, injustice or abuse.

Provided

In 1979, James Baldwin planned his next book, "Remember This House," a personal account of the lives and assassinations of three of his close friends – Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.  But at the time of his death in 1987, he had completed only thirty pages of his manuscript.

Provided

In 1961, during the Civil Rights Movement, the Congress of Racial Equality recruited volunteers for a series of bus rides. David Fankhauser, a 19-year-old student, boarded the bus to Jackson, Mississippi. There he and the other volunteers faced violence and imprisonment for protesting racial segregation at interstate bus terminals. Fankhauser was a Freedom Rider.