City spending

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati administrators will now begin the process of implementing the city's new two-year budget.  

City council approved both the operating and capital budgets unanimously Wednesday after weeks of public hearings and debate.  

Cincinnati's city manager said if Council fails to pass both an operating budget and capital budget by June 30th, it would "constitute a genuine emergency."

Harry Black told the Mayor and Council Tuesday, in a memo, that could force the city solicitor to go to court and get an order directing council to approve a spending plan.  

Cincinnati Council must pass both an operating budget and a capital budget by July 1st to comply with state law.  

It appears five members are ready to vote in favor of the operating plan, but right now, without changes, five members will likely vote against the capital budget.  

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley said Friday work continues on making changes to the city manager's proposed two-year budget.  

Six Cincinnati Council Members have signed a motion making about $4.5 million worth of changes to the city manager's two-year budget proposal.  

The Budget and Finance Committee heard about the plan Wednesday, but Chairman Charlie Winburn delayed a vote.

Several members of Cincinnati council have introduced their own version of the 2016-17 fiscal year budget for the city. 

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

The fate of Cincinnati's next two-year budget is now in the hands of city council members.  The last public hearing on the spending plan was last night in Price Hill with 20 more speakers offering testimony.  

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati residents will have one last chance Thursday evening to offer comments on the city's proposed two-year budget.  

A large crowd attended Tuesday night's hearing in Mt. Airy with 27 people offering testimony.  

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Public hearings on the Cincinnati city manager's budget proposal will continue next week. Three meetings are planned in Madisonville, Mt. Airy and Price Hill.  

Another small crowd attended Thursday night's hearing in Roselawn.  

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati Council's Budget and Finance Committee holds a second public hearing Thursday evening on the city manager's proposed 2016-2017 biennial budget.

Just a handful of residents showed up Wednesday evening for the first hearing at the Sayler Park Recreation Center.  Only three people offered testimony on the spending plan.

Cincinnati Council is a step closer to allocating the $18 million dollar surplus from the city's last fiscal year.  

The Budget and Finance Committee Monday approved the city manager's plan for using the funds.  

There was some debate about the process.  Council Member Amy Murray supports the manager's recommendations.

"But it's not like a Christmas fund," Murray said.  "It's not giveaway money.  So I think the administration has been very prudent in where they've allocated this money and that is the administration's job to give us recommendations."

Cincinnati administrators will now begin the process of implementing the fiscal year 2015 budget.  

City council Wednesday approved the 17 ordinances needed to enact the spending plan.  The votes were 6-3 on the major changes to the budget.  
Council adopted Mayor John Cranley's proposal with about a dozen changes to it.  Cranley said it sends the right message.

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati Council is expected to approve the city's operating budget Wednesday for the fiscal year which starts July 1st.  

The Budget and Finance Committee held a final public hearing on the spending plan Tuesday night.  25 people offered their comments at Midway Elementary School in Westwood.  

The majority of them spoke in favor of city funding to improve neighborhood business districts.

Jay Hanselman

Six Cincinnati Council members are ready to approve the city's operating budget for the next fiscal year which begins July 1st.  

The Budget and Finance Committee held a meeting Monday to approve a motion making a handful of changes to Mayor John Cranley's proposed spending plan that was presented to Council last month.  A final vote on the proposal is set Wednesday.

Jay Hanselman

If all goes as planned, by the middle of this week Cincinnati Council will have approved an operating budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1st.

Council's Budget and Finance Committee has special sessions set for Monday and Tuesday.  The group will be making final modifications to the spending plan Mayor John Cranley sent to Council on May 14th.  

There's a final public hearing Tuesday evening at 6 at Midway Elementary School on Glenmore Avenue.  

The full Council is scheduled to take a final vote on the budget Wednesday afternoon.  

Jay Hanselman

There was a larger turnout for Wednesday night's second public hearing on the proposed Cincinnati budget for the next fiscal year which starts July 1st.  

20 people addressed Council's Budget and Finance Committee during the session at the Oakley Community Center.  

Evanston Community Council President Anzora Adkins said she supports city funding for the Greater Cincinnati Port Authority.  She said it has done good work in her neighborhood.

Jay Hanselman

A small number of people showed up Wednesday night to speak about the proposed Cincinnati budget for the next fiscal year.  There were lots of empty chairs in the auditorium and only eight people offered testimony.

Some of them want continued funding for on road bicycle lanes.  The proposed budget could cut money for bike lane maintenance and eliminate dollars to build new ones.

Jay Hanselman

Mayor John Cranley presented a new budget Wednesday morning which closes a $22 million budget hole without lay-offs of city employees.

Cranley, in a press conference at police headquarters, said the $358 million general fund budget, if passed by city council, would be the first structurally balanced city budget in more than a decade.

“No gimmicks, no on-time revenue streams,’’ Cranley said, surrounded by several city council members and representatives of the police and fire departments and city employee union officials.

Cincinnati budget officials are working to put together the city's spending plan for the next fiscal year.  Department heads will likely begin making presentations to Council about their budgets in two weeks.  

Budget and Finance Committee Chairman Charlie Winburn had suggested those half hour presentations start at the end of May.  But council members wanted more time for the process so the schedule was changed.

Council member Kevin Flynn asked for the additional time.  He said the previous schedule was not aggressive enough.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati officials are showing a nearly $16 million General Fund deficit for the next budget year starting July 1st.

The information is contained in a tentative tax budget city council's Budget and Finance Committee will consider during a public hearing on January 6th.  The document must be provided to the Hamilton County Auditor by January 20th.  That office will use it to set the property tax millage rate for 2015 based on estimated property valuation.

Jay Hanselman

Six Cincinnati Council Members are ready to restore about $4 million to the recently approved city budget after better than anticipated revenue collections for May and June.  

The funds will be used for things like recreation, parks, human services and the health department.  Council Member Laure Quinlivan said there's added money for parks too, which was a popular topic during public hearings in May.

Provided

Cincinnati Council officially balanced the budget Thursday for the next fiscal year that begins in a just a few weeks.  But once again the plan relies heavily on one-time sources and juggling other funds to close a $35 million deficit.  

There are no police and fire layoffs, but some 60 other city employees will be out of work.  

Residents can also expect some city services to be affected... plus two recreation centers will close and five city swimming pools will be shut down after this summer.  

Jay Hanselman

Right now eight of the nine Cincinnati Council Members are supporting a budget plan that prevents any layoffs in the police and fire departments.  The Budget and Finance Committee approved the budget motion Wednesday.  But those numbers may change some when final votes are taken Thursday.  

But about 60 other city workers will get pink slips in a few weeks and some services will be scaled back in order to close a $35 million general fund deficit.  

Michael Keating

A Cincinnati Council committee is expected to approve a budget plan Wednesday that now includes no layoffs for police officers and firefighters.  But about 60 other city employees will likely be out of work in a couple of weeks.  

Back in March the city manager proposed laying off 344 city workers including police officers and firefighters.

Right now there are three separate budget motions and the plan is to combine them in one large item for Wednesday vote.  

However the city's longer-term issue of spending more money than it takes in will continue.

Jay Hanselman

Once again preventing park cuts and saving public safety jobs were the focus of many speakers during a Cincinnati Council hearing Monday night on the city’s budget.

There was a smaller crowd for the session at the College Hill Recreation Center, and about 30 speakers offered testimony.

About half of them are asking Council not to reduce funding for the parks department.   The board that runs those facilities has threatened closures and reduced maintenance if the city manager’s budget is adopted.

Jay Hanselman

Don’t cut parks and public safety. Those were the dominate themes last night during the first of three public hearings on Cincinnati next budget, which City Council must approve by June 1st.

About 50 speakers offered testimony to Council’s Budget and Finance Committee in a session at the Duke Energy Convention Center that lasted about three hours.

A dozen speakers spoke against cuts to the parks department including resident Polk Laffoon.

Michael Keating

Two Cincinnati Council Members are supporting a plan to eliminate all the proposed firefighter layoffs while reducing police officer layoffs to 25.  

Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls and Council Member Chris Seelbach announced the proposal Thursday.

“We will continue to look for additional savings that could reduce layoffs even further,” Qualls said in a press release.  “We must preserve essential services that keep all of our neighborhoods safe and clean.”

Sarah Ramsey

Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory's budget plan released Wednesday reduces the number of police and fire department layoffs.  But 53 firefighters and 49 police officers would still be out of work in early June.  

Mallory said he believes the public safety layoffs are unavoidable.

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati City Manager Milton Dohoney Thursday presented his proposed budget for the new fiscal year that begins on July 1st.   His plan included layoffs for 201 city employees, but that’s down from the 344 he first discussed last month.

Dohoney’s budget plan was given to Mayor Mark Mallory, who now has ten days to review it and make changes before sending it to City Council.

Jay Hanselman

Can Cincinnati balance its next budget without money from a proposed parking lease or massive layoffs?  The answer to that question depends on who you ask.  

City administrators say it's mathematically impossible to balance without one or the other.  

But some Council Members disagree.  P.G. Sittenfeld said during a special meeting Thursday there are options.

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