city budget

Michael Keating

Two Cincinnati Council Members are supporting a plan to eliminate all the proposed firefighter layoffs while reducing police officer layoffs to 25.  

Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls and Council Member Chris Seelbach announced the proposal Thursday.

“We will continue to look for additional savings that could reduce layoffs even further,” Qualls said in a press release.  “We must preserve essential services that keep all of our neighborhoods safe and clean.”

Sarah Ramsey

Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory's budget plan released Wednesday reduces the number of police and fire department layoffs.  But 53 firefighters and 49 police officers would still be out of work in early June.  

Mallory said he believes the public safety layoffs are unavoidable.

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati City Manager Milton Dohoney Thursday presented his proposed budget for the new fiscal year that begins on July 1st.   His plan included layoffs for 201 city employees, but that’s down from the 344 he first discussed last month.

Dohoney’s budget plan was given to Mayor Mark Mallory, who now has ten days to review it and make changes before sending it to City Council.

Jay Hanselman

Can Cincinnati balance its next budget without money from a proposed parking lease or massive layoffs?  The answer to that question depends on who you ask.  

City administrators say it's mathematically impossible to balance without one or the other.  

But some Council Members disagree.  P.G. Sittenfeld said during a special meeting Thursday there are options.

Proponents of Cincinnati’s plan to lease the operation of its parking meters and garages say it’s critical to solving the city’s budget problems. But opponents to the proposal say it’s a bad deal for the city and its residents.

Join us Thursday morning March 21 at 9:20, as we explore the details and possible outcomes of the parking lease proposal fight. You can send your questions or comments to impact@wvxu.org. We’re also on Facebook and Twitter. Impact Cincinnati, on 91.7, WVXU.

Cincinnati’s City Manager has laid out a plan to let a public/private partnership lease and operate some the city’s parking garages and all the city’s parking meters.  

Now City Council has to decide whether to approve it.  

The city would partner with the Greater Cincinnati Port Authority and four other companies to operate the system.  

City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. addressed the issue of parking rate Tuesday during a presentation to Council’s Budget and Finance Committee.

Jay Hanselman

The full Cincinnati Council has formally approved the 2013 city budget.

Most of the votes were 6-3…with Qualls, Young, Quinlivan, Seelbach, Simpson and Thomas voting yes and Sittenfeld, Smitherman and Winburn voting no.

Council didn’t vote Friday to approve leasing the operation of some city parking facilities to a private company.

Jay Hanselman

The full Cincinnati Council will vote Friday on the nearly 20 documents needed to adopt the city's 2013 budget.  

The Budget and Finance Committee Thursday approved the framework for the spending plan.  It takes the city manager's recommended budget and makes some ten changes to it.  

Cincinnati's City Manager released more details Tuesday about 8 of the 9 companies that submitted proposals to operate some of the city's parking facilities. 

Milton Dohoney, Jr. said in a memo 3 of the firms are offering an upfront payment ranging from $100 to $150 million plus revenue sharing provisions. 

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati Council will spend the rest of the week completing work on the 2013 city budget. 

About 40 people spoke during the final public hearing Monday night in Corryville.

There were again a number of speakers who asked Council to preserve funding for Media Bridges.  It operates several cable-access channels and a small radio station in the city.

Executive Director Tom Bishop said turnout for the group should show Council Members the value of the service.

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