Cincinnati

Alright, let’s assume for the moment that Cincinnati does land the 2016 Republican presidential nominating convention.

What would the chances be that the eventual nominee of the GOP turns out to be from Ohio, the host state, or right across the river in Kentucky?

It’s a long shot, but by no means outside the realm of possibility.

Despite having an Electoral College map that works decidedly against them, the Republicans seemingly have more potential 2016 presidential contenders than Heinz has varieties.

There’s an old saying in the game of golf – “never up, never in.”

It means that if your ball is on the green, a long way from the cup, you have to swing your putter with an extra “oomph” to get the ball somewhere close to the hole. That way, if you don’t sink it, you have an easy tap-in putt.

Sarah Ramsey

There is no question that the three Indiana riverfront casinos within easy driving distance of downtown Cincinnati’s Horseshoe Casino have taken a financial hit over the past year.

But revenues have declined in all 13 Indiana venues, and none more so than the three southeastern Indiana casinos in the Cincinnati market - Hollywood Casino in Lawrenceburg, Rising Star Casino Resort and Belterra Casino.

And it has been going on for the past four years – long before Horseshoe Casino in Cincinnati opened its doors.

We’ve seen big, high profile conventions and other gatherings in Cincinnati plenty of times in recent years.

We’ve had the national NAACP, the national FOP and others. We’ve hosted Major League Baseball’s Civil Rights game twice; and, next year, Great American Ball Park will host another whopper, the All Star Game.

All have brought beaucoup dollars into the city.

But the big prize might be right around the corner – a national presidential nominating convention. The Republican National Convention to be exact.

Cincinnati Magazine

  You might be a native, or maybe you just moved here, but, really, just “How Cincy Are You?”  For their February issue the folks Cincinnati Magazine put together several quizzes you can take to determine your Cincinnati-ousness, along with helpful hints on everything from how to run the Flying Pig to how to remove a chili stain.

Howard Wilkinson

In an effort to stem the homicides that have plagued the city first the first of the year, Cincinnati police will increase police overtime, hire officers away from other departments, add a recruit class and revive a gang unit, Mayor Cranley and Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell said this morning.

“We want people of this city to know that help is on the way,’’ Cranley said at a city hall press conference packed with neighborhood and community leaders, council members and police officers.

Jay Hanselman

Update:  Council Members Seelbach and Sittenfeld have called for a special Council meeting Thursday about today's personnel changes at city hall.  Both want to hear from the interim city manager about the changes and the manager/council relationship as it relates to the job changes. 

Some major leadership changes are coming to Cincinnati City Hall.

Interim City Manager Scott Stiles announced in a memo Tuesday that Assistant City Manager David Holmes will retire on April 1st.

The Port of Greater Cincinnati Development Authority has released details of its “substantially completed” agreements with two private companies to operate Cincinnati’s parking meters, five downtown garages, and three surface parking lots.

The Port Authority’s agreement with Xerox State & Local Solutions is for 10 years, with a provision to extend it for up to two 10-year periods thereafter. Xerox will operate and maintain 4,900 parking meters in downtown Cincinnati and the city’s neighborhoods.

City of Cincinnati

Lea Eriksen, the city of Cincinnati's budget director, is leaving Cincinnati City Hall for a similar position in Long Beach, California.

Eriksen, who has 16 years in the city administration, has resigned effective Feb. 16, although her last day in office will be on Jan. 24, according to Interim City Manager Scott Stiles.

She has accepted the position of Budget and Performance Evaluation Manager in Long Beach.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell and his district commanders will host members of the public at town hall meetings in all five of Cincinnati's police districts, beginning Wednesday night.

Blackwell, a former assistant police chief in Columbus, took over the Cincinnati Police Department in September.

Light travels at the speed of 186,000 miles per second.

Cincinnati’s mayor-elect, John Cranley, has been pushing that speed limit in the 12 days since he won a landslide victory in a low-turnout election.

He has put together a seven-member majority of the new nine-member council to convince the Port Authority of Greater Cincinnati to back off issuing $85 million in bonds for the long-term lease of Cincinnati’s parking meters and five city garages – a deal that would have put that money into the city’s coffers as an upfront payment.

Xavier University

Other than our former police chief, what does Detroit have that we don’t have? A group of Cincinnati leaders traveled to Detroit to get ideas from the city determined to pull itself up and out of bankruptcy. Sean Rhiney, director of The Eigel Center for Community-Engaged Learning at Xavier University, was part of the expedition and wrote about it for Soapbox Cincinnati.

The Port of Greater Cincinnati Development Authority has released details of its “substantially completed” agreements with two private companies to operate Cincinnati’s parking meters, five downtown garages, and three surface parking lots.

Provided

Tuesday's mayoral primary election, with its record low turnout of 5.68 percent, has convinced former mayor and congressman David Mann that Cincinnati needs a new way of electing its mayor.

Mann, who is now running for city council with Democratic and Charter Committee endorsements, said that if he is elected, he will introduce a charter amendment that will replace the direct election of the mayor system that has been in place since 2001.

Michael Keating / WVXU

Cincinnatians have a tight grip on our pocketbooks (and wallets, handbags, purses, man-bags, bank accounts, etc). Kiplinger's is out with its list of best cities for cheapskates and the Queen City is on the list at number six.

Kiplinger's says the title is a compliment. Criteria includes the mix of prosperity and affordability along with access to lots of free or low cost activities such as museums and libraries.

Here's the full list:

Pages