Cincinnati

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell and his district commanders will host members of the public at town hall meetings in all five of Cincinnati's police districts, beginning Wednesday night.

Blackwell, a former assistant police chief in Columbus, took over the Cincinnati Police Department in September.

Light travels at the speed of 186,000 miles per second.

Cincinnati’s mayor-elect, John Cranley, has been pushing that speed limit in the 12 days since he won a landslide victory in a low-turnout election.

He has put together a seven-member majority of the new nine-member council to convince the Port Authority of Greater Cincinnati to back off issuing $85 million in bonds for the long-term lease of Cincinnati’s parking meters and five city garages – a deal that would have put that money into the city’s coffers as an upfront payment.

Xavier University

Other than our former police chief, what does Detroit have that we don’t have? A group of Cincinnati leaders traveled to Detroit to get ideas from the city determined to pull itself up and out of bankruptcy. Sean Rhiney, director of The Eigel Center for Community-Engaged Learning at Xavier University, was part of the expedition and wrote about it for Soapbox Cincinnati.

The Port of Greater Cincinnati Development Authority has released details of its “substantially completed” agreements with two private companies to operate Cincinnati’s parking meters, five downtown garages, and three surface parking lots.

Provided

Tuesday's mayoral primary election, with its record low turnout of 5.68 percent, has convinced former mayor and congressman David Mann that Cincinnati needs a new way of electing its mayor.

Mann, who is now running for city council with Democratic and Charter Committee endorsements, said that if he is elected, he will introduce a charter amendment that will replace the direct election of the mayor system that has been in place since 2001.

Michael Keating / WVXU

Cincinnatians have a tight grip on our pocketbooks (and wallets, handbags, purses, man-bags, bank accounts, etc). Kiplinger's is out with its list of best cities for cheapskates and the Queen City is on the list at number six.

Kiplinger's says the title is a compliment. Criteria includes the mix of prosperity and affordability along with access to lots of free or low cost activities such as museums and libraries.

Here's the full list:

A Cincinnati group trying to revamp Cincinnati’s troubled pension system through a charter amendment paid a California firm nearly $70,000 to put petition circulators out on the streets of Cincinnati.

Cincinnati for Pension Reform, a group that includes some long-time tea party activists, says it collected nearly 16,000 signatures, which are now being checked by the Hamilton County Board of Elections. They need the valid signatures of 7,443 Cincinnati voters to put the issue on the November ballot.

The Banks Partnership

New details are being released about the next phase of the Banks project along the Ohio river.

Phase II A will feature a nine-story building running the length of Second Street from the Freedom Center to Race Street.

The development will include 305 apartments and 21,000 square feet of retail space.

Cincinnati and Hamilton County officials are slated to sign off on the project later this month. If everything moves on schedule, construction would begin in December with an expected opening date in fall 2015.

From a release:

Sarah Ramsey

UPDATE: 6/13 5:40 pm

Cincinnati lawyers have filed a brief with the appeals court objecting to the plaintiffs' request for a stay in parking case.  The first two paragraphs from the city's request:

Poor old Cincinnati Republicans.


They don’t have a mayoral candidate of their own.


There’s John Cranley, Democrat. Roxanne Qualls, Democrat. Jim Berns, Libertarian. And probably a couple more before the June 27 filing deadline for the September 10 mayoral primary.


But nary a Republican.

Michael Keating

Cincinnati has a new budget, but some compromises made could play a bit part in this fall's Council and Mayor's race.  Howard Wilkinson shares his thoughts.

Here's how it works:

The magic number is 8,522.

That is how many valid signatures of voters in the city of Cincinnati that opponents of the ordinance to lease out Cincinnati parking meters and garages need to place a referendum on the ordinance on the November ballot.

The petitions are filed with the city finance director. Amy Murray, a Republican city council candidate who is one of the leaders of the petition drive, said they plan to submit their signatures to the finance director on Tuesday of next week.

Are You Ohio Proud?

Mar 21, 2013
beohioproud.com

Even though I was born and raised in Kentucky, I have lived just over half of my life in the state of Ohio.  Ohio is where I have a home, a wife and three very cool kids.  So when I first heard of Be Ohio Proud, I decided that it was time to fully accept my role as a buckeye.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory's Youth Jobs Program will take place Thursday, March 28 at the Duke Energy Convention Center, but the mayor said Tuesday morning he needs more companies to get involved.

Mallory, in a press conference with city council member Yvette Simpson, said that many city departments will be offering summer jobs to young people from low-income families, but there are now about 40 non-profit and for-profit companies to set up booths at the job fair, which will run from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Michael E. Keating

Ohio Gov. John Kasich will take a break from selling his budget plan to the state legislature Monday night when he comes to Cincinnati to be the keynote speaker at the Hamilton County Republican Party's annual Lincoln-Reagan Day dinner.

The dinner and program begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Junior Ballroom of the Duke Energy Convention Center downtown, with the governor making his speech a half hour later.

The Lincoln-Reagan Day dinner is one of the party's major fundraising events of the year. This year, ticket prices begin at $75 for individuals and $750 for a table of 10.

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