Cincinnati Zoo

  Some of us take vacations to the same place each year, comfortable in knowing what to expect, the beach or Disney World, maybe. But many people use their vacations to travel outside their comfort zones, and open themselves up to new cultures, people, places and experiences.

  Thirty-five highly respected educators from the United States and Canada have been selected as this year'’s Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Education Grosvenor Teacher Fellows. The Fellows will take expeditions to locations such as Iceland, Greenland and Antarctica, for hands-on experience, professional development, and what most would say, a trip of a lifetime.

Cincinnati Zoo / Provided

The Cincinnati Zoo has a new gorilla. The sixteen-year-old Western lowland silverback comes from the Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville, Texas.

Harambe brings the total number of gorillas at the zoo to ten. Harambe weighs in at 419 pounds and is being placed in a social group with two 19-year-old females. They will not be bred together.

The Zoo says Western lowland gorillas are critically endangered in the wild, with less than 175-thousand individuals.

Cincinnati Zoo

Sunshine, a white African lion at the Cincinnati Zoo, died following surgery. He was 17 -years- old. The average age of white lions living in North American zoos  is 16.8 years.

The zoo says he and his brother Future were loaned permanently by Sigfried and Roy in 1998.  Future was euthanized in December, 2014.

  Dr. Linda Bender is a veterinarian, but much more than that. She is a passionate advocate for animals and author of “Animal Wisdom: Learning from the Spiritual Lives of Animals”, which illuminates the undeniable ability for animals to restore our ecological, emotional and spiritual balance. Dr. Bender recently spoke with Thane Maynard from the Cincinnati Zoo.

  Michael Bean has, literally and figuratively, written the book on wildlife conservation law and has directed the wildlife conservation activities of the Environmental Defense Fund since 1977. 

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden is presenting its 23rd annual Barrows Conservation Lecture Series next month. Since 1993, the series has brought a slate of esteemed naturalists and scientists to Cincinnati to address wildlife issues and global conservation efforts. Joining us today with interviews of the speakers taking part in this year’'s lecture series is Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard.

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Three lion cubs born at the Cincinnati Zoo have been referred to as “1, 2 and 3” since their birth last November.  But now they have proper names. 

The cub formerly known as 1 is now Huruma, which means compassion in in Swahili.  Cincinnati Zoo keepers picked that name to honor a colleague from the St. Louis Zoo who recently died.  Becky Wanner helped raise the cubs’ mother, Imani.  Huruma is also being referred to as Uma.

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The Cincinnati Zoo has announced the three lion cubs born in November are all female.  A release says the cubs got their first check up today.  The zoo now wants to name the cubs and is asking for suggestions via Facebook and Twitter, using  #CZBGLionCubs.

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