Cincinnati spending

Cincinnati Council has decided the city should collect about $28.988 million in property tax revenue in 2017.  

City Council approved a tentative tax budget Wednesday asking for that amount of revenue.

Cincinnati Council is expected to take action Wednesday on the city’s 2017 property tax rate.  But what the group will approve is still being debated.  

Provided

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley vetoed the Fiscal Year 2017 tax budget resolution Friday, which city council approved earlier this week by a 6-3 vote.

The proposal sets the city’s property tax rate for calendar year 2017.  

Cincinnati Council has finalized the city's property tax rate for 2017, but the measure could be subject to a mayoral veto.  

Council voted 6-3 for a 5.6 mill rate .  That will generate about $29.3 million or about $400,000 more than this year.  Voting yes:  Flynn, Mann, Seelbach, Simpson, Sittenfeld, and Young.  Voting no:  Murray, Smitherman and Winburn.  

Cincinnati's property tax rates for 2017 will remain the same as the rates for 2016.  

A council committee approved the issue Monday and a full Council vote will likely come Wednesday.  The property tax rate for general operating expenses will remain at 5.6 mills, and the rate for debt service is 6.5 mills.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati's city manager is predicting a nearly $14 million dollar budget deficit for the next fiscal year, which starts July 1st. 

Harry Black addressed the issue in a memo to Mayor John Cranley and city council members.

The city manager said the shortfall is due primarily to increases in public safety expenses and the repayment of the estate tax due to a previous collection error.  

The full Cincinnati City Council Wednesday endorsed a plan for allocating the city's $19 million budget surplus from the last fiscal year.  

About $12 million will go into the city's “rainy day” accounts, and the rest mostly goes to the police department for body cameras and other new technology.  

City of Cincinnati

The City of Cincinnati ended the fiscal year on June 30 with a nearly $19 million surplus.  Now City Manager Harry Black is presenting his recommendations on what to do with the extra money.

Cincinnati Council will likely vote Wednesday to put additional money into the city's rainy day accounts.  Those are used for emergencies or unexpected expenses during any budget year.  

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati administrators will now begin the process of implementing the city's new two-year budget.  

City council approved both the operating and capital budgets unanimously Wednesday after weeks of public hearings and debate.  

Cincinnati's city manager said if Council fails to pass both an operating budget and capital budget by June 30th, it would "constitute a genuine emergency."

Harry Black told the Mayor and Council Tuesday, in a memo, that could force the city solicitor to go to court and get an order directing council to approve a spending plan.  

Cincinnati Council must pass both an operating budget and a capital budget by July 1st to comply with state law.  

It appears five members are ready to vote in favor of the operating plan, but right now, without changes, five members will likely vote against the capital budget.  

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley said Friday work continues on making changes to the city manager's proposed two-year budget.  

Six Cincinnati Council Members have signed a motion making about $4.5 million worth of changes to the city manager's two-year budget proposal.  

The Budget and Finance Committee heard about the plan Wednesday, but Chairman Charlie Winburn delayed a vote.

Several members of Cincinnati council have introduced their own version of the 2016-17 fiscal year budget for the city. 

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