Cincinnati snow

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

**Updated March 9**

The Ohio River crested at 53 feet, Sunday, according to the Associated Press.  That's one foot above flood stage.  The river level is expected to fall slowly through the rest of the week.  The National Weather Service is predicting rain on Tuesday, and again Thursday and Friday.

**Original story** 

With plenty of rain and snow this week, area rivers are expected to rise quickly.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati has an ordinance requiring property owners to remove snow from the sidewalk, but it's a law that's rarely enforced.  Public Services spokesman Larry Whittaker says the city doesn't have the resources to go after offenders. 

“Usually when we’re in a big winter operation… we have everyone working really hard to get the streets cleared and we just don’t have the resources to strictly enforce a lot of the ordinances that are on the books,” Whittaker says.

Instead, he says they hope people do it voluntarily. 

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

**Updated 4:37pm**

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear has declared a statewide emergency, which frees up state resources, including the National Guard, to aid local jurisdictions. 

So far, Kentucky Emergency Management reports the snow has been "dry",  and has not accumulated on trees and power lines, which means limited impact on the state's energy grid.

Some parts of the Bluegrass State could receive up to 16 inches by the time the snow ends tonight.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The Cincinnati city administration is promising everything will be done to make the streets safe after Monday morning's snowfall.  Many places in the area reported receiving two to four inches of snow.

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley says everything will be done to clear city streets as soon as possible but he is warning that Tuesday could be worse.

Colder temperatures Monday night are expected to re-freeze anything that melts during the day, creating icy streets. 

Mark Heyne / WVXU News

Cincinnati will be starting the snow season with less road salt than it would like, but things could be worse.

Public Services Director Gerald Checco told a council committee Tuesday so far there is about 16,000 tons in storage.

“We know several cities, several villages around Cincinnati that have asked us to sell them the salt that they could not procure,” Checco said.  “We also are aware of entire states without salt contracts at this point.  That is going to be resolved, but that is a problem that we are very much mindful of.”

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