Cincinnati Parks

Keith Lanser / Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

Now that Cincinnati voters have rejected a property tax levy to fund city parks, the question becomes how to pay for maintenance and upgrades?  

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Wednesday morning about Tuesday's election results in the Tristate - including the massive defeat if Issue 3, which would have legalized marijuana in Ohio; Issue 22; the Cincinnati Parks levy rejected soundly by city voters, and Matt Bevin's somewhat surprising win over Jack Conway in the Kentucky governor's race. 

Ann Thompson

A controversial one mill levy for city parks that would have become a permanent part of Cincinnati’s city charter appeared headed for a resounding defeat Tuesday night.

In Tuesday night's unofficial vote count, the “no” vote on Issue 22 was 59 percent, with only 41 percent voting “yes.”

Keith Lanser / Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

To say the proponents of Issue 22, which would place a one mill permanent tax levy in Cincinnati’s charter, are out-spending the opposition would be the understatement of the century.

Citizens for Cincinnati Parks, the pro-Issue 22 committee, raised $647,535 through Oct. 14, according to campaign finance reports filed Thursday. Just over half of the money came from corporate interests and corporations.

Save Our Parks, the committee opposed to Issue 22, raised only $3,154, according to its campaign finance report.


During this program, anti-Issue 22 advocate Donald J. Mooney Jr. was critical of the Cincinnati Park Board for taking a $200,000 donation from the private Meyer Fund and giving it to Great Parks, Great Neighborhoods Inc., a committee that is campaigning to pass the charter amendment. Mooney questioned the legality of giving the money to Great Parks, Great Neighborhoods. Attorney Tim Burke, a supporter of Issue 22 and a former park board member, argued that it was perfectly legal and that no public funds were given to the pro-Issue 22 campaign.

Keith Lanser / Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

The most contentious issue on the ballot this November in Cincinnati centers around something almost everyone agrees on – that the city of Cincinnati has a very good park system.

But the proponents of Issue 22 – a charter amendment that would place a permanent one mill tax in the city charter for park improvements – believe they could be even better.

Howard Wilkinson

The Hamilton County Board of Elections Monday morning rejected a challenge to the wording of a Cincinnati charter amendment that would create a one mill tax for city parks.

Jay Hanselman

An effort to put a levy on the November ballot to support Cincinnati Parks got a major boost Friday.  

Volunteers announced they had collected more than 21,000 petition signatures.  They only need 5,969 to make the ballot.  The campaign turned in 17,907 of the signatures, the maximum allowed by state law.


The Cincinnati and Hamilton County park systems, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, Boone County Arboretum, the Civic Garden Center, Spring Grove Cemetery & Arboretum, our region is blessed with a wealth of public gardens, parks, woods and green spaces.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati Parks wants to ask voters in November for a 1 mill tax levy to fund capital improvements and operating costs.