Cincinnati Mayor

Jim Nolan/WVXU

 

Candidates for Cincinnati mayor and city council make their final push before Tuesday's election as supporters and opponents of Ohio Issues 1 and 2 ramp up their campaigns.

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Next Tuesday voters will decide who will lead the City of Cincinnati over the next four years, Yvette Simpson or John Cranley.

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There are three candidates competing to become Cincinnati's next mayor: the incumbent, Mayor John Cranley; Council Member Yvette Simpson; and former University of Cincinnati Trustee Rob Richardson, Jr. The primary is May 2, though early voting began April 4. The two top vote-getters in the primary will face off in the November election.

Cincinnati voters may see a series of city charter amendments on the November ballot.  Or they might not.

Jay Hanselman

Discussions continue around changing the balance of power between Cincinnati's mayor and the city council.  City voters may see something on the ballot for a Charter change next year.

Council Member Christopher Smitherman is working with city lawyers on his fourth version of an ordinance to create an executive mayor form of government in the city.  He discussed the issue Tuesday during a committee meeting.  

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley is holding a press briefing Wednesday afternoon  to highlight his first year in office.

In advance of meeting with reporters, the Mayor's office released a three-and-a-half page document that list highlights during Cranley's first year.  He took office on December 1, 2013.

Some of those highlights include a balanced budget, thousands of jobs and more cops on the street.

  The mayor of a city can be considered its chief executive officer. But the power that office holds is determined by a city’s rules or charter, which defines what a mayor can, and cannot, do. Cincinnati adopted a “strong mayor” system of government 15 years ago. Now Cincinnati Councilman Christopher Smitherman is exploring another change, to what some call an “executive mayor” system.

City of Cincinnati

Former Cincinnati mayor Mark Mallory has taken a high-level job with a Pittsburgh-based engineering company.

Mallory, who left office Nov. 30 after eight years as Cincinnati’s mayor, will be the senior vice president and national director of community and North American economic development for the Chester Group.

The Chester Group provides “energy, water and wastewater solutions to public and industrial clients across the United States and internationally,” the company said in a press release.

Mayor Mark Mallory

Nov 14, 2013
City of Cincinnati

  As Mayor Mark Mallory prepares to leave office, what will Cincinnatians remember most about his eight years leading the city, and where does he go from here? Howard Wilkinson talks with Mayor Mallory about his accomplishments, his legacy, his baseball pitching ability, and his possible future plans.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati mayor-elect John Cranley has a lot of big plans for his upcoming tenure but no topic is more dominating than his desire to halt the streetcar project. It was the main focus of a meeting with press Wednesday in his Hyde Park home.

"Look," Cranley said, "This isn't an ideological thing for me. I don't relish stopping the streetcar... The fact is it's just not worth the money. It's worth cancelling as long as that's the cheapest option as opposed to continuation."

Michael Keating

WVXU political reporter, Howard Wilkinson talks about tomorrow's election and the last 24 hours of campaigning in the Cincinnati Mayor's race.

Say what you want about Mark Mallory’s eight years as mayor of Cincinnati, which are rapidly coming to a close.

You can love him; you can loathe him.

What you can’t do is ignore him.

The man is a showman. Part stand-up comic. Your genial host. The man of a thousand quips.

And, if you find yourself on the wrong side of an issue he supports, a bulldog, who fights and claws and cajoles until he gets what he wants. A mini-LBJ. A chip off the ol’ block – his father, William Mallory Sr., a leader in the Ohio House for decades, was the same way.

Next Tuesday Cincinnati voters decide who’s going to lead the city for the next four years, as they elect a new mayor and city council. Assistant Director for Philosophy, Politics, and the Public Honors Program at Xavier University, Dr. Gene Beaupre, and Cincinnati Enquirer Assistant Editor, Government and Public Affairs, Carl Weiser, join Howard Wilkinson and Jay Hanselman to look at the races, and the issues on the ballot November 5.

Jay Hanselman

Mayor Mark Mallory, quickly coming to the close of his eight years as Cincinnati mayor, used a combination of serious talk, comedic one-liners, videos and slide shows Tuesday night to make the case that he has helped turned a struggling city around.

Before a crowd of about 200 invited guests on a set dressed like a living room at Over-the-Rhine’s Ensemble Theatre, Mallory talked for an hour and five minutes about the legacy he leaves when he vacates the mayor’s office Dec. 1.

Jay Hanselman

Roxanne Qualls says if she's elected Cincinnati mayor in the November election, she'll select Council Member Wendell Young to be her Vice Mayor.

Qualls made the announcement Monday during a press conference on the sidewalk outside the Hamilton County Board of Elections

“He is someone who has shown, since he’s been on City Council, tremendous judgment, maturity, and leadership as well as a clear ability to work with the other members of Council to forge coalitions and also to be very collaborative,” Qualls said.

Michael Keating

This week WVXU Political Reporter, Howard Wilkinson talks about how the direct election of Cincinnati's mayor came about, also more talk about John Kasich's presidential ambitions.

Michael Keating

John Cranley and Roxanne Qualls will be the candidates for Cincinnati Mayor in November, but the percentages in  yesterday's election surprised some.  WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson shares his thoughts.

Cincinnati Bar Association

Eugene Ruehlmann, who was mayor of Cincinnati in the late 1960s and early 1970s, died Saturday night at the age of 88.

Mr. Ruehlmann, a lawyer who was first elected to council in 1959, served through 1971. During his last four years on council, his Republican council colleagues elected him mayor; and he is credited with working to put together the deal that led to the construction of a new stadium on the riverfront and helping to bring professional football to the city.

Michael Keating

Cincinnati has a new budget, but some compromises made could play a bit part in this fall's Council and Mayor's race.  Howard Wilkinson shares his thoughts.

Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory is rescinding raises he gave to several of his staff this week.

In a statement Mallory says:

“I am rescinding the raises that I gave my staff and returning all salaries to the previous levels.  Although the changes that I made in my office structure resulted in a saving of $66,000 to be used in next year’s budget, I realize that the perception has had a negative effect on the morale of other City Employees."

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory's Youth Jobs Program will take place Thursday, March 28 at the Duke Energy Convention Center, but the mayor said Tuesday morning he needs more companies to get involved.

Mallory, in a press conference with city council member Yvette Simpson, said that many city departments will be offering summer jobs to young people from low-income families, but there are now about 40 non-profit and for-profit companies to set up booths at the job fair, which will run from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.

On the same day, mayoral candidate John Cranley proposed a debate soon over the issue of privatizing parking meters, his opponent, Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls, proposed a series of five post-primary debates - after council has acted on the parking issue.

Cranley, a former city council member, opposes the plan - which has yet to be formally introduced in Cincinnati City Council - while Qualls is a supporter.

In decades of writing column, I don’t think I have ever started one on a personal note.
 

But with this most interesting year coming to a close, and a new one about to begin, I will, if you will indulge me.


For me, it has been quite a year.


After 29 years, six months and two days at the Cincinnati Enquirer, writing on politics and a myriad of other subjects, I took an early retirement offer from the Enquirer in April, leaving behind working on a daily basis with good friends and  opportunities to do interesting journalism too numerous to count.

This week WVXU Political Reporter Howard Wilkinson talks with Maryanne Zeleznik about the certified results of the Presidential Election in Ohio and the upcoming Cincinnati Mayor's race.

At the moment, there are only two announced candidates for Cincinnati mayor in 2013, both Democrats – Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls and former city council member John Cranley.


And they happen to be two of the most popular politicians of  Cincinnati voters in the past two decades.


The only time the two of them were on the ballot together in a Cincinnati City Council race was in 2007.
 

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Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls – who served as Cincinnati’s mayor in the 1990s – formally launched her campaign to return to the mayor’s office with an event Thursday morning in Walnut Hills that drew dozens of supporters.


One of those supporters was the present mayor, Mark Mallory, who will be term-limited out of office in 2013. Mallory appointed Qualls as vice mayor; and made her chair of Cincinnati City Council’s most influential committee, the Budget and Finance Committee.
 

Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls - who was Cincinnati's mayor in the 1990s - will formally announce her candidacy in the 2013 mayoral race Thursday morning in Walnut Hills.

The current mayor, Mark Mallory, who is term-limited out in 2013, will accompany Qualls at a gathering at a pottery factory on Gilbert Avenue in Walnut Hills.

Mallory's 2009 campaign manager, Jens Sutmoller, will run Qualls' 2013 bid for the mayor's office.

One other candidate, also a Democrat, has announced his candidacy for mayor - former council member John Cranley.

Photo by Michael Keating

Cincinnati Council Member P.G. Sittenfeld is not going to run for Mayor next year.  Sittenfeld said this morning he'll seek another term on Council during the 2013 election.  

He said many friends and community leaders encouraged him to consider the Mayor's race.

"I enjoy the work on Council and I do feel good about the impact I'm having there," Sittenfeld said.  "And frankly I want to continue a lot of the priorities I've started."

The Hamilton County Board of Elections isn’t finished counting the votes from the Nov. 6 election; but it was only a matter of time before the 2013 race for Cincinnati mayor began.


John Cranley, the former Democratic city councilman and two-time congressional candidate, settled that hash this week when he announced he will be a candidate for mayor, issuing a press release and holding a flurry of media interviews.


Clearly, the 38-year-old Cranley, who has been out of office for nearly four years now, saw the value of being the first horse out of the gate.

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John Cranley, the 38-year-old Democrat elected to four terms on Cincinnati City Council from 2001 through 2007, has become the first announced candidate for Cincinnati mayor in the 2013 election.

The present mayor, Mark Mallory, can't run again because of the city's term limits law, which limits the mayor to two four-year terms.

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