Cincinnati Mayor

Jay Hanselman

Discussions continue around changing the balance of power between Cincinnati's mayor and the city council.  City voters may see something on the ballot for a Charter change next year.

Council Member Christopher Smitherman is working with city lawyers on his fourth version of an ordinance to create an executive mayor form of government in the city.  He discussed the issue Tuesday during a committee meeting.  

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley is holding a press briefing Wednesday afternoon  to highlight his first year in office.

In advance of meeting with reporters, the Mayor's office released a three-and-a-half page document that list highlights during Cranley's first year.  He took office on December 1, 2013.

Some of those highlights include a balanced budget, thousands of jobs and more cops on the street.

  The mayor of a city can be considered its chief executive officer. But the power that office holds is determined by a city’s rules or charter, which defines what a mayor can, and cannot, do. Cincinnati adopted a “strong mayor” system of government 15 years ago. Now Cincinnati Councilman Christopher Smitherman is exploring another change, to what some call an “executive mayor” system.

City of Cincinnati

Former Cincinnati mayor Mark Mallory has taken a high-level job with a Pittsburgh-based engineering company.

Mallory, who left office Nov. 30 after eight years as Cincinnati’s mayor, will be the senior vice president and national director of community and North American economic development for the Chester Group.

The Chester Group provides “energy, water and wastewater solutions to public and industrial clients across the United States and internationally,” the company said in a press release.

Mayor Mark Mallory

Nov 14, 2013
City of Cincinnati

  As Mayor Mark Mallory prepares to leave office, what will Cincinnatians remember most about his eight years leading the city, and where does he go from here? Howard Wilkinson talks with Mayor Mallory about his accomplishments, his legacy, his baseball pitching ability, and his possible future plans.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati mayor-elect John Cranley has a lot of big plans for his upcoming tenure but no topic is more dominating than his desire to halt the streetcar project. It was the main focus of a meeting with press Wednesday in his Hyde Park home.

"Look," Cranley said, "This isn't an ideological thing for me. I don't relish stopping the streetcar... The fact is it's just not worth the money. It's worth cancelling as long as that's the cheapest option as opposed to continuation."

Michael Keating

WVXU political reporter, Howard Wilkinson talks about tomorrow's election and the last 24 hours of campaigning in the Cincinnati Mayor's race.

Say what you want about Mark Mallory’s eight years as mayor of Cincinnati, which are rapidly coming to a close.

You can love him; you can loathe him.

What you can’t do is ignore him.

The man is a showman. Part stand-up comic. Your genial host. The man of a thousand quips.

And, if you find yourself on the wrong side of an issue he supports, a bulldog, who fights and claws and cajoles until he gets what he wants. A mini-LBJ. A chip off the ol’ block – his father, William Mallory Sr., a leader in the Ohio House for decades, was the same way.

Next Tuesday Cincinnati voters decide who’s going to lead the city for the next four years, as they elect a new mayor and city council. Assistant Director for Philosophy, Politics, and the Public Honors Program at Xavier University, Dr. Gene Beaupre, and Cincinnati Enquirer Assistant Editor, Government and Public Affairs, Carl Weiser, join Howard Wilkinson and Jay Hanselman to look at the races, and the issues on the ballot November 5.

Jay Hanselman

Mayor Mark Mallory, quickly coming to the close of his eight years as Cincinnati mayor, used a combination of serious talk, comedic one-liners, videos and slide shows Tuesday night to make the case that he has helped turned a struggling city around.

Before a crowd of about 200 invited guests on a set dressed like a living room at Over-the-Rhine’s Ensemble Theatre, Mallory talked for an hour and five minutes about the legacy he leaves when he vacates the mayor’s office Dec. 1.

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