Cincinnati Edition

Miguel “"Mike"” Benito Fernandez has made two long journeys in his life. The first came when he and his family were exiled from Cuba in 1964 with no warning and no money. They soon made New York City their home and faced a new path of challenges, opportunities and lessons. His second journey came in 2013 when Fernandez made the 508-mile pilgrimage along El Camino de Santiago from France through Spain to raise money for the Miami Children’'s Hospital. He tells his story in a new book, “Humbled by the Journey: Life Lessons for My Family and Yours.” Today, Fernandez is a successful businessman and philanthropist who believes in the power of giving back to others. He talks with us about his life’'s journeys.

Thanks to high-definition cameras, monitors and advances in communications technology, and driven by a growing shortage of physicians, telehealth is quickly growing in use and popularity. It allows a patient to consult with a healthcare provider remotely instead of traveling to an office or clinic, and the costs involved are usually much less than a traditional office visit. Joining us to look at how telehealth is helping to change the practice of medicine are Dr. Debi Sampsel, chief officer of innovation and entrepreneurship at the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing; Pam Kimmel, director of telehealth for UC Health; and, Megan Gresham, director of corporate communications with Maple Knoll Village.

  Richard Green worked at The Cincinnati Enquirer for 16 years starting in 1988, before moving on to management positions with Gannett in Palm Springs and De Moines. And now he’s back. Earlier this month, Rick Green took over as president and publisher of The Enquirer. He joins us to discuss returning to the city'’s only remaining daily newspaper, and how The Enquirer is changing and evolving to compete in a 24-7 digital news environment.

  According to the Association for College Admission Counseling, the average U.S. school has one guidance counselor for every 500 students. In many poorer school districts, where arguably the need is much greater, the ratio is even worse. Northern Kentucky University recently hosted the annual National Evidence-Based School Counseling Conference, where experts explored the best methods and practices to positively impact student achievement.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Angelina Jolie made the difficult choice of having her breasts, ovaries and fallopian tubes removed because genetic tests showed, without the elective surgery, she had an 87 percent chance of getting breast cancer and a 50 percent chance of developing ovarian cancer.

Jolie's mother died at 56 years old. She also lost her grandmother and aunt to cancer. In a New York Times op-ed the filmmaker and actress explained why she made that decision.

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