Cincinnati City Council election

Sarah Ramsey

An automatic recount is warranted in the race for the ninth and final Cincinnati City Council seat between Republican Amy Murray and Democrat Laure Quinlivan, but it is up to Quinlivan whether the recount will go forward.

In the official count by the Hamilton County Board of Elections done this week, Murray led Quinlivan by 859 votes – within the one-half percent difference that triggers an automatic recount.

But Sally Krisel, the deputy director of the board of elections, said Quinlivan could ask the board not to do the recount.

Some final thought on the 2013 election, before we move on to the 2014 election (which, of course, is already well underway).

Apathy wins by landslide:  On Dec. 1, John Cranley will be sworn in as Cincinnati’s 69th mayor, along with nine city council members – three of whom are newly-elected.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Clearly, the majority of Cincinnati voters who went to the polls Tuesday were determined to shake up Cincinnati City Hall, electing John Cranley as their new mayor and changing the face of the nine-member city council.

Cranley, a 39-year-old Hyde Park resident who grew up in Price Hill and a former council member, easily defeated a fellow Democrat who has been one of the top vote-getters in the Queen City over the past three decades, Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls.

In the unofficial vote count, Cranley took 58 percent to Qualls’ 42 percent.

Michael Keating

This week WVXU Political Reporter Howard Wilkinson talks about the money being spent in the Cincinnati Mayor and Council races.

One thing is certain in this year’s Cincinnati City Council election – there will be at least one new member taking office on Dec. 1.

Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls is running for mayor; and that opens her seat to one of the 13 challengers in a field of 21 candidates, which includes all eight incumbents.

City of Cincinnati

Tuesday’s primary election left just two candidates in the race to be Cincinnati’s next mayor. We discuss each candidate’s campaigns and their chance of success in the November general election with Xavier University Assistant Director for Philosophy, Politics, and the Public Honors, Dr. Gene Beaupre, and XU Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology, Dr. Mack D. Mariani. We also take a look at how the race for city council is shaping up.

When you cast your ballot in this year’s Cincinnati City Council election, the ballot will look the same as it always has – a long list of 20-plus names, among whom you can choose up to nine.

And, as always, the top nine finishers in the council field race will become the new city council.

But this is a council election unlike any other in most people’s living memory.

Since 1925, when the charter form of government replaced the corrupt and incompetent ward system, Cincinnati voters have been choosing council members to serve two year terms.

No more.

A field of 22 candidates filed petitions by Thursday's 4 p.m. deadline to run for nine Cincinnati City Council seats in the Nov. 5 election.

Board of Elections officials said late Thursday afternoon they were still checking the petitions of four of those candidates to see if they have the required 500 valid signatures of Cincinnati voters to qualify for the ballot.

At least one new council member will be elected in November, because Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls is running for mayor.

At least two Cincinnati Council candidates have problems with the petitions they filed with the Hamilton County Board of Elections.

Board officials confirmed there were technical problems with petitions submitted by incumbent Council Member P.G. Sittenfeld.

This is not your parents’ Charter Committee.


Not the staid old political organization, that, back in the 1920's, threw out the corrupt political bosses and instituted Cincinnati’s charter form of government. And who have, through the decades, sat back and scolded Democratic and Republican council members alike for going beyond their role of setting policy and interfering with the professional administrators of the city.


Some people have felt in recent years that Charter lacked relevance, pushed to the back burner of city politics.

People in Cincinnati have different opinions as to what goes on inside Cincinnati’s City Hall, but most would agree, it’s rarely boring. On today's Cincinnati Edition, a look at the upcoming races for mayor and city council.

Sarah Ramsey

The Cincinnati AFL-CIO Labor Council has endorsed for re-election all the Democratic incumbents on Cincinnati City Council except one - Laure Quinlivan.

Quinlivan is convinced it is because she ran afoul of Firefighters Union Local 48 in the recent debate over the city budget, where she argued that police and fire services should be subject to the same kind of budget-cutting as other city services; and suggested that police and firefighters should be paying more for their health insurance coverage.

Yes, the Cincinnati mayor’s race is the big-ticket item on this November’s ballot.


But there is a Cincinnati City Council race too, and there are going to be some serious choices for Cincinnati voters to make when it comes to picking nine people to set the policy for the city for the next four years.


Yes, four years. Since the late 1920s, council has had two year terms; but that changes with this election because of a charter amendment passed by voters last year.

Provided

Now that the Cincinnati Democratic Committee has endorsed 10 Cincinnati City Council candidates, the trick for the party will be to let loyal Democrats know that they can only vote for nine of them.


“Yes, we need to develop a message on that,’’ said Hamilton County Democratic Party chairman Tim Burke said. “And, yes, it is a highly unusual situation.”


What happened was this:

Campaign website

Kevin Johnson, a West End business owner and aide to former council member Laketa Cole, didn't get the nominating committee's recommendation for a Democratic party endorsement, but he is running for Cincinnati City Council anyway.

Johnson will kick off his campaign at 6 p.m. Thursday at Sonny's All Blues Cafe, 4040 Reading Rd., North Avondale.

Johnson said, years ago, that is where he had a conversation with former Cincinnati mayor Dwight Tillery that "set my life on a different path. I trace my passion for public service back to that day."

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