Cincinnati City Council

John Cranley
Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley rolled out his version of the $1.6 billion all-funds city budget Thursday afternoon, one in which he restored about $3 million in cuts that were in the budget proposal of City Manager Harry Black.

It is, Cranley said, a structurally balanced budget that plugs a $26 million deficit for this year.

Cincinnati city council members made it clear Monday that they don't much care for City Manager Harry Black's idea of plugging part of a budget hole with a parking ticket increase.

Black's proposed budget would increase parking tickets from $45 to $60.

City of Cincinnati

The Cincinnati city solicitor has issued a legal opinion reminding council members to be careful not to violate the Ohio Open Meetings Act.

The memo from Paula Boggs Muething addresses three recent meetings that caused some concern about notifying citizens of public meeting.

The repercussions of the city of Cincinnati declaring itself a "sanctuary city" have spread like kudzu on a Georgia highway.

We've had Sean Spicer, the White House press secretary, standing at the lectern in the White House briefing room specifically singling out Cincinnati as one of those cities that could lose federal funding because of its policy toward immigrants, without distinction between those here legally or illegally.

Cincinnati and Hamilton County officials hope to have a full-time housing court up and running by next fall. But, first, they must get the Ohio Supreme Court and Ohio legislature to sign off on it.

Wikimedia Commons

 

Families who pay more than 30 percent of their income for housing may have difficulty affording necessities such as food, clothing and medical care. 

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Representatives of Metro and the city say they're still tweaking the Cincinnati Bell Connector system. A council committee today heard complaints that include the ticketing system, the real-time displays, stoplight timing, and frequency.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

A majority of Cincinnati council members are supporting a motion aimed at eliminating institutional racism in city government. It calls for the city manager to hire an organization to identify inequitable policies and practices and develop new policies in their place.

Howard Wilkinson

Cincinnati Council member Kevin Flynn said Wednesday that he won't run for a second term on city council next year, but Thursday, he left the door open just a bit to a possible return in the future.

Provided, City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Councilman Kevin Flynn will not seek re-election next year, but will serve the remainder of his term.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

  

Many Cincinnati residents never thought the day would come, some never wanted it to come. But after years of planning, construction, debates and political battles, the day is finally here. 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati's mayor and seven of nine city council members expressed their support for City Manager Harry Black during a special meeting Wednesday afternoon.  

A council rule prevented a vote on a motion affirming that support. To vote on the motion Wednesday required six votes in favor of immediate consideration. Only five members voted for that motion, so it did not pass.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Update 4:05 p.m.:  Mayor John Cranley said City Manager Harry Black has his full support.

In a joint statement Tuesday, Cranley and Black said they have a great working relationship, and look forward to discussing their collective success and council concerns.

A $55,000 payment from the City of Cincinnati to a Metropolitan Sewer District subcontractor last year is causing turmoil at City Hall.

Michael Keating

Update 6/26/2016 4:21 p.m.: Council members Chris Seelbach, Yvette Simpson, and Wendell Young will hold a special council meeting on the sewer district issue Tuesday at 4 p.m..

Original Post 2:33 p.m.: Some very upset members of Cincinnati City Council are demanding answers to a question that arose from an audit of the Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) – the question of who in City Hall threatened MSD's law firm with termination unless it paid a former city council member $55,000 for consulting work.

Pages