Cincinnati City Council

Ed. note: Tales from the Trail is a column that will take you behind the scenes of politics to see some of the funny, and sometimes outright bizarre things that happen on the campaign trail, based on Howard Wilkinson's recollections of 43 years of covering politics. 

Charles P. Taft II – better known to generations of Cincinnati voters as "Charlie" – is a Cincinnati politician I never knew; he passed away in 1983, the year after I arrived in Cincinnati as an Enquirer reporter. I was one of two Enquirer reporters assigned to write his obituary. 

Pixabay

In an emergency, when seconds count, three and a half hours can feel like an eternity. On July 18, 2017 that's the amount of time Cincinnati's 911 system was down. It was a record failure for the city's emergency system but it wasn't the first.

Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Cincinnati Council voted 6-3 Wednesday to allow a major expansion project at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center to go forward, despite the continuing objections of many Avondale residents who say they will feel the impact of construction.

City of Cincinnati

A deeply-divided Cincinnati City Council committee will allow the full 9-member council to decide the fate of a proposed $650 million expansion of Children's Hospital Medical Center in Avondale.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati City Council met Wednesday but couldn't act on legislative items because three members were absent.  

It takes seven votes to suspend a rule needed to pass most ordinances. With three members missing, there were only six votes.  

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

A Cincinnati Council committee did not vote Monday night on a plan that would turn over day to day operations of the Metropolitan Sewer District to a citizen board. Council members want more time.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

Cincinnati City Council strikes a compromise on human services funding, Hamilton County Clerk of Courts offers employees wage hikes and paid family leave and Ohio begins its next fiscal year with a $65 billion budget.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati Council settled a dispute today over how an extra $350,000 in human services money would be spent.

Cincinnati City Council decided Wednesday to go to court to acquire the former King Records studio building in Evanston by eminent domain.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati City Council will vote Wednesday on three ordinances needed to allow a plan to build a new Kroger store in Downtown to move forward.

The Budget and Finance Committee met Monday and approved the measures.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

President Trump was in Cincinnati Wednesday for a speech on rebuilding America's waterways. The Kroger Company announced plans to build a mixed-use project downtown, which will include the first grocery store the company has had downtown since 1969. And Cincinnati City Council looks at the city's budget and funding for the second year of the streetcar. 

John Cranley
Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley rolled out his version of the $1.6 billion all-funds city budget Thursday afternoon, one in which he restored about $3 million in cuts that were in the budget proposal of City Manager Harry Black.

It is, Cranley said, a structurally balanced budget that plugs a $26 million deficit for this year.

Cincinnati city council members made it clear Monday that they don't much care for City Manager Harry Black's idea of plugging part of a budget hole with a parking ticket increase.

Black's proposed budget would increase parking tickets from $45 to $60.

City of Cincinnati

The Cincinnati city solicitor has issued a legal opinion reminding council members to be careful not to violate the Ohio Open Meetings Act.

The memo from Paula Boggs Muething addresses three recent meetings that caused some concern about notifying citizens of public meeting.

The repercussions of the city of Cincinnati declaring itself a "sanctuary city" have spread like kudzu on a Georgia highway.

We've had Sean Spicer, the White House press secretary, standing at the lectern in the White House briefing room specifically singling out Cincinnati as one of those cities that could lose federal funding because of its policy toward immigrants, without distinction between those here legally or illegally.

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