Cincinnati City Council

Jay Hanselman

By the end of the month, Cincinnati Council will likely have spent the $40,000 in the city’s closed captioning budget for the fiscal year.

The closed captioning is displayed on the CitiCable channel.  It is also shown in the Council chamber to aid the hearing impaired.

So far this fiscal year (starting July 1, 2014), the city has spent $35,666 for captioning service.  That leaves just about $4,300 left to cover April, May and June.  Current trends suggest that money will be gone when the April invoice arrives early next month.

UC Economics Center

A study by UC's Economics Center is forecasting higher revenues for the City of Cincinnati. However, it also expects expenditures will increase as well, and at a faster rate.

The report expects revenues will climb to $400.2 million by the year 2020. Expenditures are predicted to reach $429.3 million that same year.

Council wants new parking app ASAP

Jan 26, 2015

Eight members of Cincinnati Council have signed a motion ordering the administration to implement the app that would let people pay parking meters via their smart phones. 

But, when that feature is activated and used, Parking Facilities superintendent Bob Schroer says the paid-for time won't show up on the meter.  “If we wanted to put the time back on the meter, it was going to kill the batteries, quicker,” he says.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Hamilton County Commission President Greg Hartmann says talks with the city about shared services are going well and he's optimistic.

He says a public meeting is being scheduled between the board, the mayor and Cincinnati Council's Major Transportation and Regional Cooperation Committee "to discuss opportunities for sharing and collaborating on services where we can achieve cost savings and improve efficiencies."

Sarah Ramsey

Cincinnati’s “Holiday Food for Fines” program collected 3,580 canned foods for the Freestore Foodbank and resulted in $12,780 in parking fines collected.

The program gave people with outstanding parking tickets a chance to have the late fees waived in exchange for 10 donated canned goods.

According to City Manager Harry Black, 286 people took advantage of the city’s offer; and, in some cases, people donated more than the required 10 cans of food. The people who participated were required to make a payment of $45 in addition to donating the canned food.

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