charter review

  The Cincinnati charter, adopted by voters in 1926, is the city’'s constitution. It governs every aspect of how Cincinnati is governed and how it operates. The 24-member Cincinnati Charter Review Task Force has been reviewing the charter over the past year.

A task force continues its work reviewing the Cincinnati charter, which outlines how the city is governed.  

Group members heard Thursday from the subcommittee set up to review the balance of power between the mayor and council.  

Member Alex Linser said one item that needs reviewed is what is called the mayor's “pocket veto.”

“The mayor has complete control over the legislative agenda on Council,” Linser said.  “So he decides unilaterally what gets to Council and what does not, which gives him effective control over the entire legislative process.”

Cincinnati's Charter Review task force is continuing its work.  

Task force Co-chairman Mike Morgan presented an update Tuesday to Council's Rules and Audit Committee.  

Morgan said various subcommittees have been reviewing items since last summer.  He said the full task force will meet Monday.

Cincinnati voters will likely be asked to approve a Charter amendment this November to clean-up outdated and obsolete language in the document that guides the city's government.  

A council committee approved the changes Wednesday and the full Council will vote on the issue next week.  A task force started reviewing the document earlier this year and made the recommendations.

Cincinnati's Charter Review Task Force is holding a meeting Monday afternoon at city hall.  The group is discussing ways to modernize and improve the document that guides city government functions. 

The task force is made up of 24 people with a variety of experiences.  Co-chairman Mike Morgan was a guest last month on W-V-X-U's Cincinnati Edition.

"The real goal and purpose of this task force is not that these 24 people have been ordained to re-write the Charter," Morgan said.  "This group of people is going to help facilitate a public conversation."

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