Charter Committee

Provided

Kevin Flynn is leaving Cincinnati City Council at the end of this month after serving one four-year term. Flynn is an attorney with the law firm of Griffin Fletcher & Herndon LLP. A member of Cincinnati's Charter Party, or Charter Committee, he is the only council member to attend every council meeting and special session since December, 2013. While Flynn could have run for another term this year, he announced as early as fall of last year that he would not seek re-election.

WVXU

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the life of a Cincinnati political icon, former council member and mayor Bobbie Sterne, who died last week at the age of 97. She was a kind and gracious person who was passionate about the issues she cared about. She had been an Army nurse on the beaches of Normandy during World War II, so there was nothing that could happen at Cincinnati City Hall that could rattle her. 

It's not surprising that, in Cincinnati, people who follow politics closely are fixated between the mayoral race between two Democrats – incumbent John Cranley and council member Yvette Simpson.

Charter Committee of Greater Cincinnati

In 1924 local corruption was so bad that Cincinnati earned the reputation as the worst-governed city in America. In June of that year, a new reform-minded group called the City Charter Committee was founded. Today that group is known as the Charter Committee of Greater Cincinnati. Mary Fitzpatrick, former board member, and Executive Committee Chairman Michael Goldman discuss the history and mission of the Charter Committee.

This is not your parents’ Charter Committee.


Not the staid old political organization, that, back in the 1920's, threw out the corrupt political bosses and instituted Cincinnati’s charter form of government. And who have, through the decades, sat back and scolded Democratic and Republican council members alike for going beyond their role of setting policy and interfering with the professional administrators of the city.


Some people have felt in recent years that Charter lacked relevance, pushed to the back burner of city politics.