Charter Committee

It's not surprising that, in Cincinnati, people who follow politics closely are fixated between the mayoral race between two Democrats – incumbent John Cranley and council member Yvette Simpson.

It is especially so because, in the May 2 primary, the paltry 11 percent of the electorate who bothered to vote in the three-candidate mayoral primary chose Simpson over Cranley by about 10 percentage points.

This Cranley-Simpson race is going to be the political equivalent of a WWE steel cage match.

But lest we forget, there is a city council race going on too.

Charter Committee of Greater Cincinnati

In 1924 local corruption was so bad that Cincinnati earned the reputation as the worst-governed city in America. In June of that year, a new reform-minded group called the City Charter Committee was founded. Today that group is known as the Charter Committee of Greater Cincinnati. Mary Fitzpatrick, former board member, and Executive Committee Chairman Michael Goldman discuss the history and mission of the Charter Committee.

This is not your parents’ Charter Committee.


Not the staid old political organization, that, back in the 1920's, threw out the corrupt political bosses and instituted Cincinnati’s charter form of government. And who have, through the decades, sat back and scolded Democratic and Republican council members alike for going beyond their role of setting policy and interfering with the professional administrators of the city.


Some people have felt in recent years that Charter lacked relevance, pushed to the back burner of city politics.