cancer

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Researchers at the University of Cincinnati's College of Medicine and Children's Hospital have discovered a target in certain types of leukemia that may be treatable with an existing drug.

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A new treatment for a rare but aggressive brain cancer like the kind John McCain is fighting is showing positive results.

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It has nothing to do with FC Cincinnati being granted a Major League Soccer franchise

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A newer prostate cancer screening method is outperforming standard prostate biopsies, according to a study from the University of Cincinnati.

todd portune cancer
Ann Thompson / WVXU

Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune will have his left leg amputated to rid his body of cancer.

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A University of Cincinnati study shows bariatric surgery can lower a woman's risk of developing cancer by at least a third.

Cincinnati Children's

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital will soon be getting a newly-approved drug that uses the body’s own immune system to fight cancer.  Kymriah, as it’s known, gives new hope to the families of kids with leukemia.

The Ohio State Medical Center

U.S. doctors are slowly turning to digital pathology to more accurately diagnose and treat cancer.

In April 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved digital microscopes for use in primary cancer diagnosis. This is the process of scanning conventional glass slides to create a virtual image. That image can be easily transferred anyplace in the world for a second opinion. Complete with a computer algorithm, the machine can also see patterns a pathologist may not be able to pick out.

Joseph Fuqua II/UC Creative Services

An ancient practice of southeast Asia is gaining popularity among college and high school students in the United States. While cigarette smoking is on the decline, Hookah bars and cafes are proliferating around college campuses. In a hookah water pipe, tobacco is mixed with glycerin and flavorings then heated.

Purdue researchers are developing a test strip, similar to the common pregnancy test, to detect cervical cancer and eventually other types of cancer and diseases.

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Some cancers, such as melanoma, may be easily detectable in their early stages, but pancreatic cancer often goes undetected until it's advanced and difficult to treat. 

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Ann Thompson / WVXU

Bindi, an Australian Koolie, American Bulldog, and Golden Retriever mix, has a happy home with Richard Hussey, as long as she remains an Ohio State Buckeye.

An Ohio State bandana never comes off her neck and she is trained to spin to OH-IO, a popular Buckeye chant.

Hussey adopted the rescue dog a year ago and some months later noticed a growth on her nose was getting larger. The bump was a cancerous tumor.

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For decades, head and neck cancers were associated with risky behaviors like smoking and drinking,— but now a new cause of the disease has been identified: the human papillomavirus (HPV). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now reports that 72 percent of these cancer cases are HPV-related.

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The head of one of Cincinnati's largest companies says the region needs a bigger cancer research program.


Cancer touches everyone. About half of all men and one-third of all women in the United States will develop some form of cancer during their lifetimes. More than 1.5 million new cancer cases are diagnosed each year, and there are millions of people living who have survived cancer. 

Jazz musician and composer Zac Greenberg’s album Unexpected Journey was recorded live at The Redmoor in Mt. Lookout last April, during a fundraiser for the Barrett Cancer Center at the University of Cincinnati. 

In case you haven’t noticed, some really big equipment has been moving into the Children’s Hospital Liberty Campus and its impact for cancer patients could be huge.

The New Children's/UC Health Proton Therapy Center, scheduled to open in the winter of 2016-2017, has giant equipment that can zero in on a 3D image of a tumor and "spray paint" the cancerous cells with radiation without damaging surrounding cells.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Lauren Hill, the Mount St. Joseph basketball player, was determined to turn the fact that she was dying from an inoperable brain cancer into something positive that might help save others.

She succeeded.

Update: A public memorial service will be held Monday, April 13 at Xavier University’s Cintas Center at 7 p.m. A private funeral service will be held Wednesday.

The university also says a “Run for 22” event the Mount’s resident assistants had planned for Sunday has been postponed.

  On March 30, CET, KET and other PBS stations will begin airing a new 6-hour Ken Burns production, Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies. The documentary, based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee, takes a detailed look at one of our most dreaded diseases. Joining us for a preview of the film and to discuss what we know, and don'’t know, about cancer, are physicians with the University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute, Dr. Rebecca Cornelius, Dr. John Morris, and Dr. Thomas Herzog.

  There are approximately 14.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. Once their treatment for cancer ends, many of these individuals find it difficult to make the transition to what becomes their new normal, where they must adjust to new feelings, new problems, and different ways of looking at the world. To help these survivors,  a new field of cancer care called cancer survivorship has evolved.

  

People who worked at Fernald, GE, or other nuclear-related facilities have a new health screening option.The University of Cincinnati's Cancer Institute is partnering with the Building Trades National Medical Screening Program to expand lung cancer testing.

The groups are targeting former employees, over age 55, with a history of smoking.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

After appearing in a wheel chair last week, Lauren Hill stood on her own Tuesday before a crowd of students at Mount Saint Joseph University. She came to thank them for turning out for her first collegiate basketball game and raising funds for The Cure Starts Now Foundation.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Flanked by her parents, Lauren Hill looked at the crowd of doctors and researchers working to find new treatments for her rare form of cancer, and smiled.

"Just keep working hard and never give up," she said. "I don't expect any of you guys to give up."

Mount St. Joesph University basketball player Lauren Hill's "Layup 4 Lauren" campaign to raise money for pediatric cancer research went viral. On Thursday, Hill handed over a check to Cincinnati Children's Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute's DIPG registry.

Devon Still and Cincinnati Children's

Maybe you have joined the Saint's Sean Peyton and the Eagles' Chip Kelly in buying a $100 Devon Still jersey to support pediatric cancer research at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

Thursday, at the game, the Cincinnati Bengals will present a check from the jersey sales to the hospital for $1 million. Still's 4-year old daughter Leah is planning to see the presentation in person. She's well enough to travel.

Sarah Ramsey / WVXU

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center is getting high praise.  It ranks third overall in the U.S. News and World Report's 2013 Best Children's Hospitals ranking.  And for the first time, Cincinnati Children's was ranked number one for pediatric cancer care. 

Rosie Carson back to host concert event

Apr 12, 2013

For the second year, Cincinnati musician Rosie Carson, who has been touring internationally of late, will come home to host and perform at a fundraiser dedicated to her mother, Sue Carson. Sue lost her battle with cancer, so proceeds from the event, which also features The Graveblankets and Tickled Pink, will benefit Cincinnati’s Cancer Family Care, which provides education and counseling to cancer patients and their families. The concert happens Tuesday, April 16 at the 20th Century Theater. Rosie joins Frank Johnson to talk about this event, her recent travels, and the new CD she and partner Kevin Dempsey will have out in October.

There are currently over 115,000 men, women and children in the United States who are waiting for some type of organ transplant. Many wait years for a compatible donor.

Join us Thursday morning April 4 at 9:20 as we discuss what it’s like to be in need of an organ transplant, and to be an organ donor. Impact Cincinnati, on 91-7, WVXU. You can send your questions or comments to impact@wvxu.org. We’re also on Facebook and Twitter. Impact Cincinnati, on 91.7, WVXU.

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute are studying whether a widely used cholesterol-reducing drug can help prevent the recurrence of colorectal cancer.

The multi-year study is currently looking for participants.

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