Black History Month

For Black History Month: Frank Johnson has a preview of many of the events and activities that will be taking place at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in this conversation with Chris Miller, Manager of Program Initiatives. 

For Black History Month: the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County will be celebrating the month with the theme African American Women in Cincinnati. 

Provided

 

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) was established on September 9, 1915 by Dr. Carter G. Woodson. The association founded Black History Month and continues the work and mission of Dr. Woodson, who is known as the "Father of Black History."

George Washington Carver was an accomplished botanist, known for his discovery of many uses for the peanut, but his life required great perseverance and character to overcome a wealth of societal obstacles.

Provided, Negro Leagues Baseball Museum

  In the first half of the 1900s racism and Jim Crow laws kept African-American baseball players from being on the same teams as white players. So in 1920 the Negro National League was formed, soon followed  by other rival Negro Leagues. An exhibit now on display at the Galleries at Sinclair in Dayton, Ohio, Shades of Greatness, is the first collaborative art exhibition inspired by the history of Negro Leagues Baseball.

In honor of Black History Month, Natalie Hastings, the communications director from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, joins Mark Perzel in studio to discuss special programs and exhibits at the Center this month, as well as provide a brief update on how the Center is faring with the growth of The Banks project in its front yard.


You hear Chris DeSimio each Saturday morning hosting On the Money, but did you know besides being a successful investment counselor, Chris is also the president of the Friends of Harriet Beecher Stowe House? As we begin Black History Month, Mark Perzel turns the tables and interviews Chris about the importance of Harriet Beecher Stowe to the Underground Railroad, and provides information about her family and their home at Gilbert Avenue and Martin Luther King Blvc.  that is now meticulously maintained inside by the Friends group, and the Cincinnati Park Board on the outside.