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When it comes to retirement, the picture for many Americans is a bleak one. In today's do-it-yourself world of the 401k plan, most have less than $30,000 saved. A third have nothing at all.

Claudia Kalb is a health and science journalist whose new book looks at some of the great minds, and possible mental illnesses, of some of the most talented, acclaimed artists and scientists through history.

Author Shelley Shepard Gray has kicked-off a new series of novels, The Charmed Amish Life.

She’s a Cincinnati native, successful TV writer/producer (“Smash” “Law and Order: Criminal Intent”), playwright and author.

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Pro athletes, surgeons, first responders, they all perform amazing feats while under a high amount of stress. So why do they thrive under pressure, while others don’'t? 

Simon & Schuster

1789 was a perilous time for the newly-formed United States. The first representatives of the new Federal Congress arrived in New York City with little idea how the nation's government would actually work. There were arguments underway over numerous issues from presidential power to national finance, as well as the idea of placing the nation's capital on the Potomac River.

amazon.com

The political environment of 1896 had a lot of similarities to today: an electorate transformed by a growing immigrant population, an uncertain economy disrupted by new technology, growing income inequality and political gridlock that prevented the parties from resolving big issues.

George Washington Carver was an accomplished botanist, known for his discovery of many uses for the peanut, but his life required great perseverance and character to overcome a wealth of societal obstacles.

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Thinking about turning over a new leaf during the new year?  If so, how do you come up with a plan that really works? Socio-economist and CEO of the Landmark Research Group, Dr. Randall Bell, is out with a new book, Rich Habits, Rich Life.

Harvard University Press

One of the cruel abuses of slavery in America was that slaves were forbidden to read and write. But as Trinity College Associate Professor of English and American Studies Christopher Hager reveals in his latest book, “Word by Word: Emancipation and the Act of Writing,” some enslaved African Americans did learn to read and write, and during the early years of emancipation thousands more became literate.

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